Lifelong Learners Program - Black Hawk College

Lifelong Learners Program

Program Description

In-person vs. virtual classroom vs. online?

  • An in-person class provides the traditional on-site instruction.
  • A virtual classroom provides real-time, online instruction. A student is responsible for the technology needed to attend the class.

 

All Seminars will be held via ZOOM.

FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt            

Presenter: Dr. Art Pitz

Join us as we discuss the background and marriage of the Roosevelts prior to 1933 and what led to FDR’s presidency. The second session covers him assuming office during the Great Depression and how our 32nd President and First Lady had a profound impact on the country in a time of great uncertainty. Unique to FDR, he was our only four-term president. FDR is known for many things, especially The New Deal which established The Social Security Act.  Acting as his eyes and ears, Eleanor played an important role in this time period and later with her work for Civil Rights and beyond. The third session will cover FDR’s role in WW II, as well as his supporting the First Lady’s active role in politics and his health issues, as he lost his battle with his illness at 63 years of age. Eleanor, who was the longest serving First Lady, left quite a legacy of her own remaining very active after her husband’s death.

3 Thursdays       Apr. 8 – Apr. 22         10:00 a.m. – Noon

Virtual Classroom CRN 10993          Fee $30

 

The Japanese War Crimes Trials, a Look Back After 75 years    NEW

Presenter: Dr. Art Pitz

While many have heard of the Nuremberg Trials after WWII, not nearly as many are aware of the Japanese War Crimes Trials.  This seminar will provide the background for those trials and introduce you to the main trials conducted in Manila and Tokyo including the Yamashita case.  We will also discuss the significant difference between these trials and those that took place in Nuremberg.

2 Thursdays        May 20 – May 27   10:00 a.m. – Noon

Virtual classroom CRN  50206                        Fee $20

 

Lunches Seminars

Women’s Right to Vote   

Presenter: Angie Snook

In August of 1920 the 19th Amendment was ratified; there by, guaranteeing women the right to vote, the culmination of a decades-long movement for women’s suffrage at both state and national levels. Join us as we discuss what it took for American women to obtain the right to vote and the role Illinois women played in achieving the major milestone in American History

Date: Wednesday, April 21

Location: Quad City Botanical Center, 2525 4th Avenue, Rock Island, IL

Lunch: 11:30 a.m.

Presentation: 12:15 p.m.

Fee: $23 (Fee includes admission to the Botanical Center)

Last day to register or receive a refund: Apr. 7

In-Person CRN 10995

 

Westerns and the Portrayal of Bravery  

Presenter: Dr. Bill Hampes, Professor Emeritus, Black Hawk College and Author

Join us for an interesting presentation by Dr. Hampes on his book, Cowboy Courage: Westerns and the Portrayal of Bravery. Dr. Hampes will discuss how Westerns have demonstrated different types of courage (physical, moral and psychological) while using discussion and video clips from film and television westerns to show how courage can lead to and even enrich other virtues, such as redemption, authenticity, love, friendship, community, justice, and growing up and growing old successfully.

Date:   Wednesday, May 19

Location: Quad City Botanical Center, 2525 4th Avenue, Rock Island, IL

Lunch: 11:30 a.m.

Presentation: 12:15 p.m.

Fee: $23 (Fee includes admission to the Botanical Center)

Last day to register or receive a refund: May 5

In-Person CRN 10996

 

Sons & Daughters of Thunder    

Presenters: Kelly and Tammy Rundle, Documentarians and Filmmakers of Fourth Wall Films

Join us as award winning, Emmy-nominated filmmakers Kelly & Tammy Rundle of Fourth Wall Films present their film, Sons & Daughters of Thunder, based on the play by Earlene Hawley and Curtis Heeter. This film tells the unforgettable true story of the first-in-the-nation 1834 emancipation debates led by firebrand abolitionist Theodore Weld in Cincinnati, Ohio, and their effect on a young Harriet Beecher Stowe.

 

Discussing the abolition of slavery in 1834 was considered radical, even in the North. Organized by Weld, the nation’s first public debates at Lane Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio led to near riot conditions in the city.

The shocking oratory sparked intense controversy and awakened a young Harriet Beecher Stowe to the horrors of slavery. Harriet was captivated by Weld’s charismatic leadership at a time when Calvin Stowe was trying to win her heart.

Inspired by Weld and the debates, Harriet later distilled her Cincinnati experiences into the world-wide best-selling novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”. This forgotten true story from award-winning filmmakers Kelly Rundle and Tammy Rundle was a prelude to America’s Civil War.

Date:   Thursday, Aug. 12

Location: Quad City Botanical Center, 2525 4th Avenue, Rock Island, IL

Lunch: 11:30 a.m.

Presentation: 12:15 p.m.

Fee: $23 (Fee includes admission to the Botanical Center)

Last day to register or receive a refund: July 28

In-Person CRN 80646