BHC cuts gauze ‘ribbon’ for new Health Sciences Center

Health Sciences Center open house ribbon cut 9-1-15 077 (web)

Black Hawk College officials arrived by college ambulance then cut ceremonial gauze Sept. 1 to celebrate the new Health Sciences Center at the Quad-Cities Campus in Moline.

More than 120 people – including representatives from the health care industry, BHC students and elected officials – attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house.

Construction of the three-story, 55,100-square-foot facility began in April 2014. The $15 million project was paid for with 2012 bond funds.

Not only are students learning in a new building, they have new learning tools. The college received two state grants to buy new patient simulator manikins, hardware, software and other health sciences equipment, hospital beds and other furniture, and a refurbished ambulance.

Health Sciences Center open house ribbon cut 9-1-15 080 (web)

The Health Sciences Center houses these programs:

  • Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)
  • Basic Nurse Assistant Training Program (CNA)
  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
  • Health Information Management (HIM)
  • Medical Assisting (MA)
  • Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA)
  • Practical Nursing (LPN)

In the future, the building also will house two new programs – Surgical Technology (certificate and associate of applied science) and Veterinary Assisting (certificate).

Black Hawk College thanks the State of Illinois and the Illinois Community College Board for providing funds to purchase equipment for the Health Sciences Center.

State of Illinois Capital Development Board – $310,000 grant

  • SimMan (2) and SimJunior (1) patient simulator manikins
  • Hospital beds (24)

Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) – $285,000 grant

  • EMS patient simulator manikin
  • Used ambulance
  • Teaching equipment

Black Hawk College is seeking gold-level LEED green building certification. Project attributes include:

  • Water-efficient landscaping used
  • Potable water usage reduced by 35%
  • More than 20% of materials in building have recycled content
  • Low-emitting VOC adhesives, sealants, paints, flooring and composite wood used
  • Existing forest habitat east of building maintained
  • Amount of stormwater leaving site reduced
  • 90% of occupied spaces have exterior view
  • LEED-accredited professionals worked on project

Visit Facebook to see photos from the ribbon-cutting ceremony and the open house.

Media coverage:

 

Last updated 9/1/2015

Vintage rods hosting 44th car show Sept. 27 at BHC

The Quad City’s Vintage Rods 44th Annual Car Show on Sunday, Sept. 27 at the Quad-Cities Campus will highlight more than 350 shiny, pampered vintage automobiles owned by club members and other collectors from around the Midwest.

Join BHC on a foodie bus trip to Chicago

farmers market produceFood enthusiasts are invited to visit Chicago’s finest markets and hidden gourmet shops this fall with Black Hawk College.

Three Chicago Food Bus Trips will be led by Chef Stephanie Godke. Choose from these trip dates:

  • Chicago Farmers’ Markets and Gourmet Goodies – Thursday, Sept. 17.
  • Bus to Chicago Ethnic Neighborhoods – Tuesday, Oct. 20.
  • Gourmet Shopping for the Holidays – Wednesday, Nov. 18.

Cost is $90 per bus trip. All trips will leave at 7 a.m. from the BHC Outreach Center in East Moline and return at approximately 8 p.m.

For trip details, visit www.bhc.edu/chicagobustrips. To register, call BHC Professional and Continuing Education at 309-796-8223.

Major military contract will impact QC businesses

Story courtesy of WQAD Ch. 8

Posted 3:37 pm, August 27, 2015, by Angie Sharp
Updated at 03:59pm, August 27, 2015

Something happening 250 miles away is big news for businesses in the Quad Cities.

On Wednesday, August 26th, Oshkosh Corporation in Oshkosh, Wisconsin held a press conference announcing that the U.S. Army is awarding them a multi-billion dollar contract to build a new kind of armored vehicle for the military, which would phase out the Humvee.

“Today indeed is a historic day for Oshkosh Corporation,” said CEO, Charles Szews. “We are honored that the U.S. government has chosen Oshkosh to produce the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle or JLTV.”

The $6.7 billion contract will be used to build 17,000 of the military vehicles for the U.S. Army and the Marine Corps. The contract could also be extended up to $30 billion over the years.

“We’re excited about this,” said Vicky Miller, Director of Illinois-PTAC. “This is a great bit of information for our region.”

PTAC is the Procurement Technical Assistance Center and is supported by Black Hawk College in Moline. Miller covers 10 counties in the northwest region of Illinois and helps small businesses find work with big businesses through government contracts.

“The government has a requirement that flows down to these large prime contractors that 23% of that spend shall go to small businesses and so I help the business learn how to  position themselves for those subcontracts,” she explained.

When it comes to the Oshkosh contract, Miller said she let her clients know almost immediately.

“We are just rich with manufacturing processes and we have some of the best manufacturing companies, I believe, in this world and they’re right here in this area,” she said. “I think we have a total of over 500 in this region and so we have the best of the best right here and hopefully our businesses will step up to the plate and tap into these opportunities and we’re here to help them.”

Miller said it’s free to work with her office, which is supported by the Defense Department’s Defense Logistics Agency as well as the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity in Illinois.

“Also, our host is Black Hawk College so with those three streams of funding, there is no charge to work with our center,” she added.

PTAC helps businesses become per-certified with the federal government, which makes the registration process easier.

“We also help them with bid proposals, so when they’re putting proposals together we want them to be successful in these proposals and so we help them with that,” Miller said. “We help them with a lot of training to understand some of the requirements that the government is going to have because those are flow-down requirements from that prime contractor to the businesses who are going to work with large prime contractors such as Oshkosh.”

To learn more about Illinois PTAC, click here.

Meanwhile, the Rock Island Arsenal is positioning itself to do work with Oshkosh. Right now, workers at the Joint Manufacturing and Technology Center (JMTC) are retrofitting existing Humvees to become ambulances for the National Guard. They released this statement to WQAD on Thursday, August 27th:

“For more than 150 years, the Arsenal has been a National Security Insurance Policy – providing critical capabilities in delivering readiness not only to the Army, but to the entire Joint Force,” said Rhys Fullerlove, Public Affairs for RIA-JMTC. “Although no agreements are in place yet, we are ready to answer any calls for this project or any other warfighter needs.”

“The Arsenal has developed public-private partnerships and so there’s opportunity for them as well, so we want to do everything we can to help support the Rock Island Arsenal and all the initiatives over there,” added Miller.

Agriculture Transfer AS

Last updated 8/18/2015

Associate in Science Code 7519

Program Contacts:
East Campus

Recruiter, 309-854-1724
Jeff Hawes, 309-854-1835, hawesj@bhc.edu
Jason Grice, 309-854-1839, gricej@bhc.edu


Students who plan to complete a bachelor’s program with a major in agriculture are encouraged to enroll in the Agriculture Transfer Program at Black Hawk College East Campus.

All East Campus courses have been articulated with the four Illinois universities which offer degrees in agriculture including: Illinois State University (Normal), Southern Illinois University (Carbondale), Western Illinois University (Macomb), and University of Illinois (Champaign/Urbana).

These articulation agreements allow students completing the associate degree in agriculture to continue their education at these four-year institutions without loss of credits. Many BHE agriculture graduates have successfully transferred to universities across the country, such as Purdue, Iowa State, Michigan State, Oklahoma State, Kansas State, Colorado State, and Texas A & M.

Students should work closely with an academic adviser to plan a two-year program designed for successful transfer of credits.

Agriculture Transfer AS
Associate in Science Code 7519
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
AG 100 — Introduction to Agriculture (1)
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
* AG Electives (4)
Humanities Elective (3)
Life Science (4)

Second Semester
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication (3)
* AG Electives (4)
Mathematics (3)
Physical Science (4)

Third Semester
* AG Electives (4)
Fine Arts Elective (3)
Non-Western Studies (3)
Mathematics  or  Computer Science (3)
Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)

Fourth Semester
* AG Electives (7)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts (3)
Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)
Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

* A minimum of 19 elective hours in agriculture are required in the Agriculture Transfer Program. Suggested electives include: (Fall semester) AG 280, AG 281, AG 285, or AG 287;
(Spring semester) AG 282, AG 283, HORT 284, AG 288, AG 289.

Courses for this program include: »

AG 100 Introduction to Agriculture
1 cr. hr.;
1 lecture hour; 0 lab hours per week.
A study of agriculture in our modern society. Emphasis on leadership development, educational goals and employment opportunities. Brief orientation to the College and agriculture division.

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900

Pre-Veterinary Medicine/Animal Science Transfer AS

Last updated 8/18/2015

Associate in Science Code 1540

Program Contacts:
East Campus
Recruiter, 309-854-1724
Jeff Hawes, 309-854-1835, hawesj@bhc.edu
Jason Grice, 309-854-1839, gricej@bhc.edu


This degree is offered only at the  East Campus.

Students interested in pursuing a baccalaureate program with a major qualifying them to apply at a school of veterinary medicine have the opportunity to enroll in the Pre-Veterinary Medicine program at Black Hawk College East Campus. The Pre-Veterinary Medicine curriculum presented here is based on the requirements for an Animal Science Degree with a Pre-Veterinary Medicine Option at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. If students are interested in a different major and/or a different college qualifying them to apply to a college of veterinary medicine, contact an academic advisor or the college to which transfer is anticipated. This Pre-Veterinary Medicine program is part of the nationally recognized agriculture programs at Black Hawk College East Campus.

All Black Hawk College transfer courses are articulated with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as well as the other three Illinois universities that offer degrees in agriculture including Illinois State, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and Western Illinois University. These articulation agreements allow students completing an Associate’s degree to easily transfer to these four-year institutions. Many graduates who complete agriculture related degrees at the East Campus have also successfully transferred to universities throughout the nation such as Purdue, Iowa State, Michigan State, Oklahoma State, Colorado State and Texas A & M.

Admission to schools of veterinary medicine is highly competitive; therefore, students should work closely with an academic advisor to plan their course of study.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine/Animal Science Transfer AS
Associate in Science Code 1540
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
AG 100 — Introduction to Agriculture (1)
AG 285 — Animal Science (4)
BIOL 105 — General Biology I (4)
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
Fine Arts Elective (3)
Humanities Elective (3)

Second Semester
BIOL 261 — Microbiology (4)
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
MATH 132 — Calculus for Bus/Soc Sciences
2Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)

Third Semester
PHYS 101 — College Physics I (5)
CHEM 101 — General Chemistry I (4)
1Mathematics  or  Computer Science Elective (3)
Non-Western Studies Elective (3)
2Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)

Fourth Semester
CHEM 102 — General Chemistry II (4)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication (3)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts Elective (3)
2Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective (3)
3Elective (1)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

1Suggested MATH electives include: MATH 108, 124, 131, 132.
2Suggested Social and Behavioral Science Electives include: ANTH 102, ECON 221, ECON 222, HIST 105, HIST 106, PHIL 101, PSYC 101, SOC 101.
3Suggested elective is PHYS 102.

Courses for this program include: »

AG 100 Introduction to Agriculture
1 cr. hr.;
1 lecture hour; 0 lab hours per week.
A study of agriculture in our modern society. Emphasis on leadership development, educational goals and employment opportunities. Brief orientation to the College and agriculture division.

AG 285 Animal Science
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A comprehensive view of the livestock industry as a science. Study is based upon biological principles with application to modern livestock management practices for beef, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats and horses. Includes animal breeds, breeding and selection; anatomy, physiology, nutrition, growth; environment, health and sanitation; products and marketing; production technology and economics; animal behavior; and current issues in animal science. Laboratory to supplement lectures and discussions. IAI: AG 902

BIOL 105 General Biology I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Students must be eligible for (as determined by COMPASS score or other assessment) or currently enrolled in college level Math and English courses (100-level or greater).
For science and pre-professional majors and those with strong interest in science. This course includes the principles of cellular and molecular biology, including the chemistry of life, metabolism, photosynthesis, classical and molecular genetics, genetic regulation, and cellular reproduction. IAI: L1 900L; BIO 910

BIOL 261 Microbiology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 105 or 145 or instructor consent.
The study of microorganisms including historical background, morphology, physiology, growth, identification, genetics, control, immunology, and diseases. Laboratory is stressed.

CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 110; or the completion of MATH 112 “C” or better, Math 118 “C” or better, or Math 123 “C or better, or by Algebra assessment.
Fundamental principles of stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure and thermochemistry with applications to gases, liquids, solids and solutions. IAI: P1 902L; CHM 911

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101.
Continuation of CHEM 101. Equilibrium calculations, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, coordination compounds, inorganic chemistry. IAI: CHM 912

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

MATH 132 Calculus for Bus/Soc Sciences
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or MATH 112 “C” or better.
A calculus course which includes differential and integral calculus as applied to business, economics, sociology and natural science. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, and integration. IAI: M1 900-B

PHYS 101 College Physics I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent or instructor consent.
For students majoring in a field other than pre-engineering, mathematics or physics. Theory of mechanics, heat and sound. Graduation credit not permitted for both PHYS 101 and 201. IAI: P1 900L

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900

 

Four inducted into QC Foundation 2015 Alumni Hall of Fame

At an Aug. 13 ceremony, four outstanding Black Hawk College Quad-Cities Campus alumni were inducted into the 2015 Alumni Hall of Fame.

The inductees represent the best of Black Hawk College. These new members demonstrate the Black Hawk College core values of appreciation of diversity, caring and compassion, fairness, honesty, integrity, respect and responsibility.

QC Alumni Hall of Fame 8-13-15 194 (web)

Standing by their names on the QC Alumni Hall of Fame wall are 2015 inductees Jewell Perkins, Dr. Stewart Adams, Vera Hinrichsen and Virgil Mayberry.

Dr. Stewart L. Adams, Rock Island
Dr. Stewart L. Adams earned his associate degree from Black Hawk College in 1969 then pursued his bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Illinois State University. In 1974, he graduated from Illinois State University with his master’s degree in special education. In 2003, he earned his doctorate of education degree from Illinois State University.

Dr. Adams has a passion for children and youth throughout this community and taught special education students for 33 years in the Rock Island and Milan school districts. During this time, he initiated a collaborative system with special education area department chairs and an e-mail network with 70 teachers throughout the Illinois area on special education issues.

Dr. Adams has served on the Illinois State Board of Education, the Illinois Education Association, and the Illinois Advisory Council on the Education of Students with Disabilities. He also participated in the formation of the Spring Forward Learning Center, a local nonprofit that offers education and enrichment programs for students in the Rock Island and Milan area. He has also served as president and vice president of the organization.

Besides his service to the educational community, Dr. Adams is a ruling elder in his church and has been active in local politics since 1982.

Vera Ellen Hinrichsen, Rock Island
Vera Ellen Hinrichsen attended Black Hawk College between 1977 and 1992 while pursuing an early childhood education major. In 1976, she became the founding member and executive director of Just Kids Early Care and Education Centers.

Since that time, she has grown Just Kids into a nationally accredited agency and not-for-profit United Way partner. In 1993, she added Just Kids II, which is a school age program that serves kids from the age of six weeks to 12 years. What began as a small program serving 19 children in 1976 has grown into a multi-site program with 56 employees that serves more than 200 children and their families.

Vera has epitomized a life of service and volunteerism. She has participated in many committees over the years, including the Early Childhood Coalition of Illinois, Rock Island Community Foundation Board of Governor, Milan Chamber of Commerce, Milan Rotary Club, Kiwanis and United Way.

Vera and her husband have two sons, one grandson and a granddaughter on the way.

Virgil J. Mayberry, Rock Island
Virgil J. Mayberry completed a five-year metal patternmaker apprenticeship program at Black Hawk College in 1976. He took additional coursework in Spanish, statistics, criminal law and justice, and Afro-American history during his time at Black Hawk College. He later earned his Institute of Government and Public Affairs: County Leadership degree from the University of Illinois in 2011. He received additional training at the Allied Institute of Technology in Chicago, St. Ambrose University in Davenport and Scott Community College in Bettendorf.

From 1965 through 2007, Virgil was employed by John Deere and was the world’s first black Indian patternmaker. He was a time study representative for the United Auto Workers Local 434 Union, served on the Rock Island County Board of Supervisors, and currently serves in the 2nd Ward of the Rock Island City Council.

Virgil’s achievements are extensive and include serving as president of the Alliance for Retired Americans Rock Island County, founding member of the Council on Children at Risk, deputy registrar for Rock Island County, past President and founder of the Rock Island County NAACP, past president and member of the Community Caring Conference, past chair of the Martin Luther King Center Advisory Board, and a 1981 William Dawson Award Winner.

Virgil has served the community by being active as a member of the 14th Judicial District Task Force on juvenile detention, a member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and a member of ACTIVE Club of Rock Island. His other memberships have included service on the Child Abuse Council, QC Coalition of Native Americans, Bi-State Metropolitan Planning Commission, and board member for Horace Mann Choice Elementary School. His passion for children at risk, gender equality and this community has been evident throughout his life and career.

Jewell Juanita Perkins, East Moline
Jewell Juanita Perkins earned her associate degree from Black Hawk College in 1989. She went on to receive her bachelor’s degree from Western Illinois University through the Board of Governor’s program.

Jewell has served as the president of the Illinois Community College Admission and Records Office Association and served on the college’s District Finance Committee, Strategic Planning Committee, Selections Committee, and District Planning Committee for Student Information Systems. She was also the first African-American president of the East Moline District #37 school board and provided leadership in the area of voluntary school desegregation.

Jewell has upheld service in her community throughout her life. She has received the Valiant Woman Award at the local, state and national regional level. She also received the Community Trailblazer Award in 2014, and received the Distinguished Neighborhood Service Award from Project NOW Community Action Agency.

In her spare time, Jewell enjoys spending time with her five children, five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Last updated 8/14/2015

Outdoor grill safety tips

Monthly Safety Tip from your Black Hawk College Safety Committee

Outdoor grill safety tips

There is no better time to enjoy food than grilling out with family and friends.

Prior to using your grill, check to see if your grill has been recalled. Visit SaferProducts.gov. If your grill has been recalled. Stop using it until it is properly repaired or replaced.

Stay safe by following the outdoor safety tips:

  1. Use grills outside only! Never use a grill indoors or in a breezeway, carport, porch and garage or near or under a surface that will burn. Keep away from your home, deck, railings, eaves and tree branches.
  2. Be sure your grill is on even ground and well balanced.
  3. Using a charcoal grill? There are several ways to get the charcoal ready for use. Charcoal chimney starters help start the charcoal by using newspaper as a fuel. Starter fluid (only use charcoal starter fluid) can be used, however, never add the charcoal fluid or any other flammable liquids to the fire. Keep the charcoal fluid out of the reach of children and away from all heat sources. There are also electric charcoal starters, which do not use fire. Be sure you use an extension cord for outdoor use. When you’re finished grilling, let the coals completely cool before disposing of them in a metal container.
  4. If you are using a gas or propane grill, inspect the hoses for cracking, brittleness, holes and leaks. Make sure there are no sharp bends in the hose or tubing and that all connections are secure. Replace if necessary. Keep the grill hoses as far away as possible from hot surfaces and dripping hot grease.
  5. Check for gas leaks.  Brush a soapy solution at the connection.  If bubbles appear there is a leak. Try tightening the tank. If that does not stop the leak, close the gas valve and have the grill repaired by a professional. Check here to watch how to check for leaks with your propane grill.
  6. As you are cooking, if you smell gas, turn off the gas tank and burners. If the smell continues, move away from the grill and call the fire department immediately. Do not move the grill.
  7. Is your grill clean? Regularly cleaning the grill will reduce the risk of flare-ups and grease fires. Remove grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill. Check your Owner’s Manual for details on cleaning your grill and cleaning the grease trap.
  8. Never leave a grill unattended. If a flare-up occurs, adjust the controls on the gas/propane grill or spread out the coals on a charcoal grill to lower the temperature. If a grease fire occurs, turn off the gas grill and use baking soda and or a kitchen fire extinguisher to put out the fire.  Use long handled cooking utensils to prevent burns from flare ups.
  9. Outside surfaces of a grill can get extremely hot and burn when touched. Keep children and pets away from the grill area. Also keep your grill away from play areas and high foot traffic areas.

Enjoy grilling!

Disclaimer: These tips have been provided as general information for increasing safety awareness and for informational purposes only. Black Hawk College does not accept any liability for the information or advice (or the use of such information or advice) that is provided. We make every effort to insure the integrity and validity of the data provided. Always, check with your care provider before making any changes.

References:

http://www.knapp-insurance.com/index.php/insurance-news/108-julyaugust-tip-of-the-month-outdoor-grill-safety-tips

http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/outdoors/grilling/grilling-safety-tips

Health Sciences Center construction almost finished

Health Sciences Center exterior 8-10-15 (for web)The new Health Sciences Center at the Quad-Cities Campus is almost done! Construction of the three-story, 55,100-square-foot building began in April 2014.

Not only will students be learning in a new building, the college received two state grants to buy new patient simulator manikins, hardware, software and other health sciences equipment, hospital beds and other furniture, and a refurbished ambulance.

For a sneak peek at the new building, visit Black Hawk College on Facebook.

Ribbon-cutting, open house Sept. 1 for Health Sciences Center

Last updated 8/20/2015

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