Events

 
SMTWTFS
21
View all »

Tutoring

Foundation invites Wall of Fame, Distinguished Service Award nominations

The Black Hawk College East Foundation is accepting nominations for the 2014 Wall of Fame and the 2014 Distinguished Service Award.

Since 1992, the Black Hawk College East Foundation has inducted 27 individuals into its prestigious Wall of Fame.

An additional 19 individuals and organizations have received the Distinguished Service Award.

To be considered for the Wall of Fame or Distinguished Service Award, nominees must meet one or more of the following criteria:

  1. Outstanding service to a community within the Black Hawk College District.
  2. Outstanding service or leadership to Black Hawk College East Campus.
  3. Noteworthy academic achievement or scholarship associated with Black Hawk College East Campus.
  4. Significant financial contribution to the Black Hawk College East Foundation.

The deadline for nominations is Monday, Oct. 6.

Nominations forms are available online at www.bhc.edu/ecfoundation and in the Foundation Office at the college’s East Campus, located five miles south of Kewanee.

For more information, contact Jimalee Driscoll at 309-854-1718 or driscollj@bhc.edu.

BHC Livestock judges take top honors at National Barrow Show

The Livestock Judging Team from Black Hawk College East Campus took top honors recently in the junior college division at the National Barrow Show (NBS) Swine Judging Contest in Austin, Minn., as well as 1st in Reasons.

BHC sophomores spend their nights and weekends preparing for the NBS Swine Judging Contest, their first fall contest. On the way to the competition, they meet up with numerous Midwestern judging teams for an “NBS Pilgrimage.” BHC judging team coach Dan Hoge, an icon in collegiate judging circles, conducts the pilgrimage, helping all of the teams prepare for the NBS contest. This judging journey to Austin, Minn. is known as the largest collaboration of judging teams from coast to coast.

The four-day National Barrow Show celebrated its 68th year this fall. In 1974, the junior college division portion of the Swine Judging Contest was created. Before 1974, community/junior colleges and universities competed in one unified “Collegiate” division. Black Hawk College has won the junior college division 31 of those 40 years and placed reserve 9 years. In 2001, the contest was conducted under the name of American Swine Breeders Classic in Des Moines, Iowa.

Lake Land College of Mattoon, Ill., took the reserve spot Overall. This year 13 teams competed in the division.

The team coached by Hoge and Jared Boyert had four members finish in the top 10 individually with Clayton Boyert of Seville, Ohio, taking the top spot.
• Hayden Wilder of Remington, Ind. – 2nd Overall
• Maggie Neer of Urbana, Ohio – 5th Overall
• Kendall Steines of Springbrook, Iowa – 7th Overall

BHC’s Wilder – one of 90 contestants in the junior college division – took the high individual spot in Reasons, with Boyert placing 5th.

Rounding out the team were Kade Knapp of Stanwood, Iowa; Colton Geiger of Columbia City, Ind. and Tyler Dawson of Rushville, Ind.

Filling out the top four spots behind Black Hawk College were:
• Lake Land College, Mattoon, Ill. – 2nd
• Blinn College, Brenham, Texas – 3rd
• Lincoln Land Community College, Springfield, Ill. – 4th
• Casper College, Casper, Wyo. – 5th

This event is co-sponsored by Hormel Foods Corporation and the National Association of Swine Records.

The next contest for the team will be Sept. 27-28 at the Ak-Sar-Ben Livestock Expo in Omaha, Neb.

Tips for managing stress, maintaining balance

Monthly safety tip from your Black Hawk College Safety Committee

Managing stress and maintaining good balance in your life is important for not only college students, but college employees as well.

A few ways to manage stress are to effectively manage your time, get enough sleep, exercise, connect socially, and seek help from a medical or mental health professional  if you feel depressed or experience distress.

Time is your greatest asset in life and YOU get to choose how you spend it! Try to manage your time by prioritizing your health, homework and hanging out with friends and family.

Although you may hear many people say, “Sleep is something I can do when I am dead,” getting good sleep is an integral part of staying healthy and a healthy life comes with quality living.

Fitting exercise into a busy schedule isn’t always the easiest thing, but try going on a walk with your friends or play a sport. Make it fun and you won’t even notice you are doing the dreaded task of exercising!

Last, but not least, connect socially. There are few things that can cheer you up like being around the people you like most. Eat dinner with friends or just hang out and watch a movie; staying connected with friends and family can increase your happiness and decrease depression.

Don’t forget — it’s always beneficial to ask for help! Black Hawk College has a great counseling department ready to assist in helping you find ways to be happy and live a less stressful life!

Source: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Submitted by Tiffany Hamilton

Disclaimer: These tips have been provided as general information for increasing safety awareness and for informational purposes only. Black Hawk College does not accept any liability for the information or advice (or the use of such information or advice) that is provided. We make every effort to insure the integrity and validity of the data provided.  We encourage you to check all resources and always check with your care provider before making any changes.

BHC makes some noise in the library to celebrate renovation

BHC library ribbon cut - wide shot (web)Live jazz music, clapping and talking usually aren’t allowed in libraries, but Wednesday was an exception at Black Hawk College.

More than 100 employees, students and community members celebrated the renovation of the Quad-Cities Campus Library at a Sept. 10 ribbon-cutting and open house.

Library ribbon cut - jazz band (web)

Dr. Edgar Crockett (center) and the BHC Jazz Band performed before the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The $1.5 million project began in May and took approximately three months to complete. It included three components – interior renovation, new elevator and new windows.

The renovation updated more than 15,000 square feet of student and staff spaces and includes more than 3,000 square feet of new energy-efficient windows.

“For several months, many of our resources were in boxes or crammed into a computer lab. We did not hear complaints,” said Ashtin Trimble, director of library services for the Quad-Cities Campus.

“To our students, faculty and staff, we thank you for your patience and understanding throughout this process,” she said.

BHC library ribbon cut (web)

Cutting the ribbon are, from left – Charlet Key, former library director and professor emerita who retired in June; Ashtin Trimble, new director of library services; and Dr. Bettie Truitt, Black Hawk College interim president. Behind them are David Emerick, chair of the BHC Board of Trustees, and State Rep. Mike Smiddy.

“Our patrons took these growing pains in stride and shared in our excitement for what was in store for our library.”

The library now has all new:

  • Group study rooms with tables (three rooms that seat four people and one room that seats eight)
  • Checkout desk
  • Copy/scan center
  • Research desk
  • Offices and workstations for library staff
  • Decorative end panels for the book stacks
  • Furniture
  • ADA-compliant electric traction elevator

Also as part of the renovation, the college’s Teaching/Learning Center will move Monday, Sept. 15 from the balcony to the library. The TLC provides professional development and instructional support for college faculty members.

The TLC’s new 1,000-square-foot space will include a group training area with 12 laptop docking stations plus office space with three individual laptop docking stations.

 

 

Last updated 9-10-2014

Petitions for 2015 BHC trustee election available Sept. 16

Nominating petitions and other election materials for the 2015 Black Hawk College Board of Trustees election may be picked up at the college beginning Tuesday, Sept. 16.

In April 2015, there will be three (3) six-year terms up for election.

Election materials are available in office of the chief financial officer in Building 1 at the college’s Quad-Cities Campus, 6600 34th Ave., Moline, and in the office of the vice president for East Campus, 26230 Black Hawk Road, Galva (five miles south of Kewanee).

The Black Hawk College district includes all or part of nine counties in west central Illinois, consisting of more than 280 individual precincts.

Nominating petitions may not be circulated until Tuesday, Sept. 23. Completed petitions may be filed beginning at 8 a.m. Monday, Dec. 15 through 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 22 in the office of the chief financial officer at the Quad-Cities Campus.

For more information, call 309-796-5302.

Air National Guard Band of the Midwest free concert Oct. 4

The Air National Guard Band of the Midwest will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4 in the Hawk’s Nest (Building 4, second floor).

Vintage rods hosting 43rd car show Sept. 28 at BHC

The Quad City’s Vintage Rods 43rd Annual Car Show on Sunday, Sept. 28 at the Quad-Cities Campus will highlight more than 350 shiny, pampered vintage automobiles owned by club members and other collectors from around the Midwest.

Students, parents invited to explore options Sept. 25 at College Night

Black Hawk College will host the 43rd annual College Night from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25 at the Quad-Cities Campus in the gymnasium in Building 3.

Earth Science Transfer AA

earth
Last updated 4/7/2014

Associate in Arts Code 1038

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Richard Harwood, 309-796-5271, harwoodr@bhc.edu
East Campus
Vashti Berry, 309-854-1711, berryv@bhc.edu


Students planning to major in earth science at a four-year institution should follow the Black Hawk College Associate in Arts curriculum. The completion of the course of study outlined will satisfy graduation requirements of Black Hawk College. Since universities may require specific courses for an earth science major, students should consult with the Advising area at Black Hawk College for additional information.

The Associate in Arts degree as listed, emphasizes the social aspects of earth science, the urban studies. The catalog of the four-year school chosen should be consulted for requirements to be met and the student’s schedule adjusted accordingly.

Job possibilities include city, regional and rural planning; transportation and trade; surveying in relation to regional drainage, flora, fauna, climate and land forms; and consulting as to trade, territorial policies and international problems. It is not implied that only persons with a four-year degree will find employment in the above areas; the person with the associate degree in many cases will also find jobs available, but normally at a lower level.

Earth Science Transfer AA
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
ENG 101 —  Composition I (3)
GEOG 101 — Physical Geography  or  (4)
GEOL 101 — Physical Geology
PHIL 101 — Introduction to Philosophy (3)
Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)
Elective (3)

Second Semester
ANTH 102 — Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
Fine Arts (3)
GEOG 102 — Physical Geography  or  (4)
GEOL 102 — Historical Geology
MATH 124 — Calculus (4)

Third Semester
GEOG 105 — Introductory Regional Geography (3)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts (3)
Life Science (4)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communications (3)
Elective (3)

Fourth Semester
ARCH 203 — Introduction to Archaeology (3)
CS 101 — Introduction to Structured Programming (3)
GEOG 106 — Introductory Meteorology (3)
MATH 228 — Probability and Statistics (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Minimum total hours required for degree (66)

Courses for this program include: »

ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduction to culture, as an adaptive mechanism that provides for the survival of the human species that encompasses social organization, technology, economics, religion, and language as used by various peoples, in both traditional and technologically advanced societies. IAI: SI 901N

ARCH 203 Introduction to Archaeology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduces concepts, principles, and methods used to reconstruct cultural history and prehistory. Explores sequences of cultural development that have been learned through archeological analysis. IAI: S1 903

CS 101 Introduction to Structured Programming
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or MATH 086, 090 or 091 “C” or better.
An entry-level course in structured programming that includes branching and loops, functions, arrays, and text files. Not for computer science majors.

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

GEOG 101 Physical Geography
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A study of earth orbital factors affecting time, tides and seasons; climate, weather, soils and vegetation; interaction between man and the natural resources; map reading. IAI: P1 909L

GEOG 102 Physical Geography
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
The changing earth’s crust and surface; how natural forces such as rivers, streams, glaciers, weathering, earthquakes and volcanism affect the surface and composition of the earth; man’s interactions with his environment; fundamental map concepts. IAI: P1 909L

GEOG 105 Introductory Regional Geography
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
A study of the world’s cultural, economic, historical, political, environmental and physiographic features. The regions examined and discussed include Europe, North America, South America, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. IAI: S4 900N

GEOG 106 Introductory Meteorology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduction to atmospheric science leading to a better understanding of day-to-day weather, including frontal systems and severe storms. IAI: P1 905

GEOL 101  Physical Geology
3 lecture hours;
2 lab hours per week.
The study of the earth’s composition and forces which affect it; minerals, rocks, weathering, erosion, volcanism, structure, earthquakes and plate tectonics. IAI: P1 907L

GEOL 102  Historical Geology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Study of the origin and evolution of the earth as interpreted from the evidence in rock sequences and fossils. IAI: P1 907L

MATH 124 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 118 or MATH 112 and MATH 116 “C” or better.
First semester calculus including analytic geometry, with emphasis on functions, limits, continuity, derivative and some of its applications, differentials, antiderivatives, and the definite integral. IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

MATH 228 Probability and Statistics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 112 “C” or better.
This class discusses the descriptive and inferential methods of statistics. It includes measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, distributions of random variables, and the use of computer packages for analysis of data. IAI: M1 902, BUS 901

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or ENG 091 or REA 098 “C” or better.
Some of the basic problems of philosophy. A consideration of the great philosophical systems dating from Socrates to the present. IAI: H4 900

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900

 

Earth Science-Geology Transfer AS

Last updated 4/7/2014

Associate in Science Code 1538

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Richard Harwood, 309-796-5271, harwoodr@bhc.edu
East Campus
Vashti Berry, 309-854-1711, berryv@bhc.edu


Students planning to major in Geology at a four-year institution should follow the Black Hawk College Associate in Science curriculum. The completion of the course of study outlined will satisfy graduation requirements of Black Hawk College. Since universities may require specific courses for a Geology major, students should consult with the Advising area at Black Hawk College for additional information.

The Associate in Science degree is a rigorous science-oriented curriculum which will allow the student to pursue a major in the earth sciences at a four-year school. It is essential that the scheduled be closely followed unless the school of choice has different requirements. A variety of analytical and synthesizing skills are learned and prepare the student to continue to study and work in the earth sciences. Lab work complements the lecture material and teaches the student such practical applications as rock identification, map reading and weather analysis.

Job possibilities include environmental protection, geologic hazard assessment, research consulting, engineering and construction consulting, soil conservation, field work in natural resource management and research, natural resource production in petroleum, natural gas, coal, minerals, metals, stone and clay products. Employers include state and national geological survey departments, departments of agriculture, public utilities, the energy and natural resources industries, and educational and research institutions.

Earth Science-Geology Transfer AS
Associate in Science Code 1538
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
GEOL 101 — Physical Geology (4)
MATH 124 — Calculus I
PHIL 101 — Introduction to Philosophy (3)

Second Semester
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
Fine Arts (3)
GEOL 102 — Historical Geology (4)
MATH 225 — Calculus II (4)
Elective (3)

Third Semester
CHEM 101 — General Chemistry I  or  (4-5)
PHYS 101 — College Physics I
Life Science (4)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communications (3)
Elective (3)

Fourth Semester
ARCH 203 — Introduction to Archaeology (3)
CHEM 102 — General Chemistry II  or  (4-5)
PHYS 102 — College Physics II
GEOG 105 — Introductory Regional Geography (3)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

Courses for this program include: »

ARCH 203 Introduction to Archaeology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduces concepts, principles, and methods used to reconstruct cultural history and prehistory. Explores sequences of cultural development that have been learned through archeological analysis. IAI: S1 903

CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 110; or the completion of MATH 112 “C” or better, Math 118 “C” or better, or Math 123 “C or better, or by Algebra assessment.
Fundamental principles of stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure and thermochemistry with applications to gases, liquids, solids and solutions. IAI: P1 902L; CHM 911

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101.
Continuation of CHEM 101. Equilibrium calculations, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, coordination compounds, inorganic chemistry. IAI: CHM 912

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

GEOG 105 Introductory Regional Geography
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
A study of the world’s cultural, economic, historical, political, environmental and physiographic features. The regions examined and discussed include Europe, North America, South America, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. IAI: S4 900N

GEOL 101  Physical Geology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
The study of the earth’s composition and forces which affect it; minerals, rocks, weathering, erosion, volcanism, structure, earthquakes and plate tectonics. IAI: P1 907L

GEOL 102  Historical Geology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Study of the origin and evolution of the earth as interpreted from the evidence in rock sequences and fossils. IAI: P1 907L

MATH 124 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or MATH 118 or MATH 112 and MATH 116 “C” or better.
First semester calculus including analytic geometry, with emphasis on functions, limits, continuity, derivative and some of its applications, differentials, antiderivatives, and the definite integral. IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

MATH 225 Calculus II with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 124 “C” or better.
Second semester calculus. Includes applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, sequences and series, polar coordinates and parametric equation. IAI: M1 900-2, MTH 902

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or ENG 091 or REA 098 “C” or better.
Some of the basic problems of philosophy. A consideration of the great philosophical systems dating from Socrates to the present. IAI: H4 900

PHYS 101 College Physics I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent or instructor consent.
For students majoring in a field other than pre-engineering, mathematics or physics. Theory of mechanics, heat and sound. Graduation credit not permitted for both PHYS 101 and 201. IAI: P1 900L

PHYS 102 College Physics II
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHYS 101.
Theory of magnetism, electricity, light and topics from atomic and nuclear physics. Graduation credit not permitted for both PHYS 102 and 202.

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900