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Desktop Support Technician Certificate

Last updated 4/7/2014

Certificate Code: 5725

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Jamie Hill, 309-796-5284, hillj@bhc.edu
Don Mosier, 309-796-5278, mosierd@bhc.edu


This degree is offered only at the Quad-Cities Campus.

The Desktop Support Technician Certificate prepares individuals for positions in computer operations, maintenance, and repair of personal computers. The program develops computer technicians that will assume the responsibilities of hardware maintenance, application assistance, and software support in commercial and industrial environments. Graduates from this program will be responsible for installing software, troubleshooting and repairing or replacing faulty components (disks, memory, I/O devices, etc.), assisting with computer-related purchases and inventories, supporting peripheral devices (i.e., modems, printers, monitors), and performing basic computer maintenance.

Students starting this program and wishing to continue their education can do so with the Computer Specialist – Desktop Support Track AAS.

Opportunities for employment exist in commercial, business, and industrial environments. Typical positions include field service personnel, help desk, and computer system support staff.

Desktop Support Technician Certificate
Certificate Code: 5725
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
*ENGT 105 — PC Applications in Technology (3)
NETW 120 — Basic Computer Networks (3)
COER 116 — Microcomputer Hardware (3)
COER 110 — Basic Electronics - fall only (3)
COER 125 — IT Professional Skills (1)
NETW 210 — Windows Workstation (3)

Second Semester
COER 112 — Microcomputer Operating System (3)
COER 180 — Desktop Application Support - spring (3)
COER 216 — Advanced PC Hardware/A+ Prep (3)
COER 118 — Computer Troubleshooting (3)
NETW 215 — Windows Server (3)

Minimum total hours required for certificate (31)

Suggested electives include: CIP 126, CIP 167, NETW 125, (Spring Semester) NETW 215, NETW 255
*May substitute with CS 100 Introduction to Computers (3)

Courses for this program include: »

CIP 126 Microsoft Access
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Analysis of procedures, personnel, and hardware necessary in electronic database processing. Topics covered include review of design, creation, and maintenance of databases including a study of tables and data validation, relationships, queries, forms, reports, macros, SQL, and normalization of tables.

CIP 167 Scripting for Systems Administration
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: COER 112 or instructor consent.

The student will learn techniques for creating customized scripts in both the Linux and Windows environment. This course provides students with the skills to read, write, maintain, and debug Linux shell scripting and Windows scripting for Systems Administration.

COER 110 Basic Electronics
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A course in basic electronics for students pursuing the Computer Specialist degree or Desktop Support Technician certificate. Includes fundamental DC and AC concepts, common electronic components and basic circuits, with an emphasis on their application in PCs and peripherals.

COER 112 Microcomputer Operating Systems
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This is a course on Microcomputer Operating Systems. The two operating systems of focus are Windows and Linux. Each will be explored independently in a comparative fashion with a primary focus on the usage of the command-line interfaces.

COER 116 Microcomputer Hardware
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This course is an introduction to microcomputer hardware components, from a technician’s perspective. Content includes motherboard, CPU, memory, storage devices, and I/O devices, etc. Emphasis is on installation and repair, as well as hardware/software interaction. Not an A+ Certification prep course, but provides a foundation for future pursuit of this credential.

COER 118 Computer Troubleshooting
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: COER 116 “C” or better.

This course provides an introduction to computer support, troubleshooting methodologies, and routine computer maintenance and repair.

COER 125 IT Professional Skills
1 cr. hr.;
1 lecture hour; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Designed to be taken at the same time as the student’s internship in computer repair, network technician, or microcomputer support. Includes discussion of workplace issues, development of job-seeking strategies, and enhancement of interpersonal skills.

COER 180 Desktop Application Support
3 cr. hr.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: CS 100 and NETW 120 “C” or better, or instructor consent.

A course on supporting, configuring and troubleshooting common desktop PC application programs, providing hands-on as well as classroom experience. Content covers Microsoft Office, Internet Explorer, Outlook, etc., in a networked office environment. COER 180 covers topics included in the Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician exam or similar certification. Students should be familiar with current Microsoft operating system (XP, Vista, Etc.), basic network operation, and desktop applications from a user standpoint.

COER 216 Advanced PC Hardware/A+ Preparation
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: COER 116 and COER 112 and NETW 120 or instructor consent.

An advanced capstone course in microcomputer hardware installation, troubleshooting and repair, with an emphasis on preparing the student to take the CompTIA A+ Certified Technician certification exams. Students will take the CompTIA exams as a requirement for course completion.

CS 100 Introduction to Computers
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 1 lab hour per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or REA 093 “B” or better.

Introduction to computer concepts, computer applications, and the impact of computers on society. Applications include problem solving methods, word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics software. Basic Algebra or equivalent is recommended.

ENGT 105 PC Applications in Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A course designed for developing computer communicating information skills in an Engineering Technology career environment. Course focuses on needed computer operator skills; usage of current computer operating systems software and utilities; Microsoft’s Office application software Word, Excel, and Internet Explorer; Productivity software: Outlook; and Simulation software Automation Studio.

NETW 120 Basic Computer Networks
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
An introductory course in networking for the technical student. Includes basic network hardware, software, troubleshooting, and maintenance.

NETW 125 Cisco I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
An introductory Cisco Academy course for persons preparing for the CCNA exam or pursuing the Networking certificate or the Networking track of Computer Specialist degree. Typical subjects involve the OSI model, data links, network addressing, data encapsulation and conversion, IP addresses and subnetting, and functions of the TCP/IP network-layer protocols.

NETW 210 Windows Workstation
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to implement, administer, and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows Workstation.

NETW 215 Window Server
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: COER 112 “C” or better or instructor consent.

This course provides the students with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement, administer, and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows® Server.

NETW 255 Advanced Networking/N+ Prep
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: NETW 120 or NETW 125 “C” or better or instructor consent.
A capstone course on computer networking hardware and software, providing hands-on as well as classroom experience, with an emphasis on preparing the student for the Comp TIA Network+ certification exams. Students will take the CompTIA exam as a requirement for course completion.


Gainful Employment

Gainful employment is one important measure that students and parents should pay attention to as they examine colleges and programs. All non-degree programs must be designed to lead to gainful employment in a recognized occupation in order to be deemed eligible for federal student aid. These programs are generally less than 2 years in length and result in a certificate.

Desktop Support Technician Certificate