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Materials Science Technology AAS

material sciences technology program

Associate in Applied Science Code: 5287
Program Contacts:
Quad-Cities Campus
Adebayo Badmos, 309-796-5280, adebayob@bhc.edu
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The Materials Science Technology AAS degree is concerned with the study of materials in our everyday lives and the aim is to develop students with skills and proficiency in the structure, properties, processing, and service behavior of engineering materials including metallic, polymeric, ceramics and composites materials. The unique approach combines the teaching of basic scientific theories with hands-on-experience demanded by the industry. The new Materials Lab is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment to prepare students with the required skills to either go from school to work or transfer to a bachelor program. Students are initially prepared with the general background of basic materials science, and then proceed to learn the theory and practice of metal casting, heat-treatment processes, mechanical properties, metallographic sample preparation, and the concepts and practices involved in the production, processing and application so of industrial polymers, plastics, ceramics, glass, and composites.

In addition to the Materials Science Technology AAS degree, three 17-credit certificates are offered to allow students to focus their studies in any one of the three major areas of Materials Science Technology which are Metallurgical Technology; Ceramics and Glass Technology; or Polymers and Plastics Technology.

Materials Science Technology graduates can work as technicians in any manufacturing facilities involved with technicians in any manufacturing facilities involved with the primary production of the various engineering materials, as well as in a wide variety of other industries where materials are further processed and applied, including aerospace, automotive, microelectronics, biomedical, sports, energy, and nanotechnology.

Materials Science Technology AAS
Associate in Applied Science Code: 5287
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
ENG 101 — Composition I  or  (3)
COMM 100 — Communication Skills
ENGT 105 — PC Applications in Technology (3)
ENGT 120 — Introduction to Nanomaterials (2)
ENGT 130 — Introduction to Biomaterials (2)
MAST 101 — Introduction to Materials Science - 1st 8 wk (3)
MATH 123 — Technical Algebra/Trigonometry (4)

Second Semester
CHEM 101 — General Chemistry I (4)
ENGT 224 — Computer Programming (3)
MAST 102 — Metal Casting Technology (3)
MAST 105 — Heat-Treatment of Metals (3)
MATH 223 — Technical Calculus (4)

Third Semester
MAST 201 — Ceramics and Glass Technology - 2nd 8 wk (3)
MAST 203 — Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals (3)
MAST 204 — Metallurgy of Casting and Welding (3)
MAST 220 — Electronic Materials Technology (3)
MAST 230 — Non-destructive Testing (2)

Fourth Semester
ENGT 270 — Statics and Strengths of Materials (4)
MAST 205 — Polymer and Plastics Technology - 1st 8 wk (3)
MAST 206 — Composite Materials Technology - 2nd 8 wk (3)
MAST 207 — Statistical Quality Control (3)
MAST 209 — Failure Analysis and Corrosion (3)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

Courses for this program include: »

CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 110; or the completion of MATH 112 “C” or better, Math 118 “C” or better, or Math 123 “C or better, or by Algebra assessment.
Fundamental principles of stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure and thermochemistry with applications to gases, liquids, solids and solutions. IAI: P1 902L; CHM 911

COMM 100 Communication Skills
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
For career program students only. COMM 100 and ENG 132 fulfill requirements for an associate’s degree in several career programs. Concentration on developing skills in writing, speaking and reading.

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENGT 105 PC Applications in Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A course designed for developing computer communicating information skills in an Engineering Technology career environment. Course focuses on needed computer operator skills; usage of current computer operating systems software and utilities; Microsoft’s Office application software Word, Excel, and Internet Explorer; Productivity software: Outlook; and Simulation software Automation Studio.

ENGT 120 Introduction to Nanomaterials
2 cr. hrs.;
1 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This is an introductory level course on nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Students learn about the structure and properties relationships, fabrication, applications, current roles in technology, and the future impact on the industry.

ENGT 130 Introduction to Biomaterials
2 cr. hrs.;
1 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
An introductory course designed to introduce students to the various classes of materials used in humans and other biological systems, relationships between structure, properties and functional behavior, manufacturing processes and material biocompatibility.

ENGT 224 Computer Programming
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 223.
Acquaints students with the use of microcomputers by programming in Visual Basic and Visual C++ languages. Includes problem solving techniques using arrays, branching methods, loops, subprograms, and parameter passing.

ENGT 270 Statics & Strength of Material
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 123“C” or better or equivalent or instructor consent.
Study of static force systems, calculations of centroids, centers of gravity, friction, moments of inertia, sheer moment diagrams, properties of materials. Determining stress and strain of materials when loaded in tension, compression, shear or torsion, and combined loadings.

MAST 101 Intro to Materials Science
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This is an introductory course to materials science and technology involving the basic science and demonstration of the characteristics of solids, atomic structure and arrangement of atoms, classification of materials into metals, ceramics and polymers, and differences in the structures and properties of different materials.

MAST 102 Metal Casting Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 and concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of CHEM 101 or instructor consent.
The course introduces student to the theory and practice in metal casting principles using green sand, shell, permanent, investment, centrifugal, and loss foam processes. Students will learn the principles of pattern design, molding, melting, filling and process analysis using a variety of materials and production techniques.

MAST 105 Heat Treatment of Metals
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 or instructor consent.
The purpose of this course is to provide learners with knowledge of the relationship between the structure and properties of metals. It introduces students to physical and mechanical properties, strengthening methods, failure modes, and structure modification through thermal processing in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys.

MAST 201 Ceramics and Glass Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 or instructor consent.
This is an introductory course to the structures and properties of ceramics and glasses. Students also learn the applications and manufacturing processes used for ceramics and glass products.

MAST 203 Ferrous and Non-ferrous Metals
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 or instructor consent.
The course introduces students to some of the important engineering alloys in terms of their compositions, properties, applications and fabrication techniques. Students learn about the ferrous and non-ferrous alloys, their mechanical properties, strengthening methods, and heat-treatment processes.

MAST 204 Metallurgy of Casting/Welding
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 and MAST 102 or instructor consent.
The course introduces students to the metallurgical concepts involved with metal solidification in casting and welding processes. Students learn the basic theory of metal solidification, microstructures in castings and welded joints, casting and welding defects, and their remedies.

MAST 205 Polymer & Plastics Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 and concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of CHEM 101 or instructor consent.
This course develops an understanding of the molecular and crystal structures of polymers. Students learn the relationships between structure and some of the physical and chemical properties, along with typical applications and forming methods.

MAST 206 Composite Materials Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 205 or instructor consent.
This course introduces students to the structures, properties and processing of composites materials. The topics cover particle-reinforced composites, fiber-reinforced composites and structural composites.

MAST 207 Statistical Quality Control
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENGT 105 and MATH 223 or instructor consent.
The course involves the application of quality concepts to manufacturing environment using statistics, sampling techniques, probability, and control charts. Students learn how to develop and use statistical techniques to collect and analyze data to control quality and produce meaningful conclusions about processes.

MAST 209 Failure Analysis and Corrosion
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 or instructor consent.
This course introduces students to the principles of corrosion and failure analysis which includes electrochemistry nature of corrosion, types of corrosion, corrosion rates, corrosion behavior of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, high-temperature corrosion, corrosion testing and control, methodology of materials failure analysis, common types of metallic failures, and failure analysis case studies.

MAST 220 Electronic Materials Tech.
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 or instructor consent.
The course introduces students to the science of electronic materials. Students learn about the relationships between the internal structure, chemistry and physics of semiconductors, magnetic, and photonic materials to their electronic and optical properties, applications, and methods of device fabrication.

MAST 230 Non-destructive Testing
2 cr. hrs.;
1 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAST 101 or instructor consent.
Students are introduced to the methods, procedures, and equipment associated with non-destructive testing of materials. The course will include the principles involved in visual inspection, dye-penetrant testing, magnetic flux testing, ultrasonic testing, radiographic testing, and eddy current testing techniques.

MATH 123 Technical Algebra/Trigonometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 103 “C” or better or technical math assessment.
Trigonometric functions, vectors, complex numbers, radical equations, graphing, exponential and logarithmic functions, and related use of graphing calculator.

MATH 223 Technical Calculus
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 “C” or better or technical math assessment.
Analytic geometry, an introduction to statistical methods, limits, and differential and integral calculus with emphasis on applications in science, engineering, and technology.

Last updated 8/4/14