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Pre-Veterinary Medicine/Animal Science Transfer AS

Last updated 6/9/2014

Associate in Science Code 1540

Program Contacts:
East Campus
Recruiter, 309-854-1724
Andrew Larson, 309-854-1830, larsonan@bhc.edu


This degree is offered only at the  East Campus.

Students interested in pursuing a baccalaureate program with a major qualifying them to apply at a school of veterinary medicine have the opportunity to enroll in the Pre-Veterinary Medicine program at Black Hawk College East Campus. The Pre-Veterinary Medicine curriculum presented here is based on the requirements for an Animal Science Degree with a Pre-Veterinary Medicine Option at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. If students are interested in a different major and/or a different college qualifying them to apply to a college of veterinary medicine, contact an academic advisor or the college to which transfer is anticipated. This Pre-Veterinary Medicine program is part of the nationally recognized agriculture programs at Black Hawk College East Campus.

All Black Hawk College transfer courses are articulated with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as well as the other three Illinois universities that offer degrees in agriculture including Illinois State, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and Western Illinois University. These articulation agreements allow students completing an Associate’s degree to easily transfer to these four-year institutions. Many graduates who complete agriculture related degrees at the East Campus have also successfully transferred to universities throughout the nation such as Purdue, Iowa State, Michigan State, Oklahoma State, Colorado State and Texas A & M.

Admission to schools of veterinary medicine is highly competitive; therefore, students should work closely with an academic advisor to plan their course of study.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine/Animal Science Transfer AS
Associate in Science Code 1540
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
AG 100 — Introduction to Agriculture (1)
AG 285 — Animal Science (4)
BIOL 105 — General Biology I (4)
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
Humanities Elective (3)
Fine Arts Elective (3)

Second Semester
BIOL 261 — Microbiology (4)
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
MATH 132 — Calculus for Bus/Soc Sciences
2Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)

Third Semester
PHYS 101 — College Physics I (5)
CHEM 101 — General Chemistry I (4)
1Mathematics  or  Computer Science Elective (3)
2Social and Behavioral Sciences (3)
Non-Western Studies Elective (3)

Fourth Semester
CHEM 102 — General Chemistry II (4)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication (3)
2Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective (3)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts Elective (3)
3Elective (1)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

1Suggested MATH electives include: MATH 108, 124, 131, 132.
2Suggested Social and Behavioral Science Electives include: ANTH 102, ECON 221, ECON 222, HIST 105, HIST 106, PHIL 101, PSYC 101, SOC 101.
3Suggested elective is PHYS 102.

Courses for this program include: »

AG 100 Introduction to Agriculture
1 cr. hr.;
1 lecture hour; 0 lab hours per week.
A study of agriculture in our modern society. Emphasis on leadership development, educational goals and employment opportunities. Brief orientation to the College and agriculture division.

AG 285 Animal Science
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A comprehensive view of the livestock industry as a science. Study is based upon biological principles with application to modern livestock management practices for beef, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats and horses. Includes animal breeds, breeding and selection; anatomy, physiology, nutrition, growth; environment, health and sanitation; products and marketing; production technology and economics; animal behavior; and current issues in animal science. Laboratory to supplement lectures and discussions. IAI: AG 902

ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduction to culture, as an adaptive mechanism that provides for the survival of the human species that encompasses social organization, technology, economics, religion, and language as used by various peoples, in both traditional and technologically advanced societies. IAI: SI 901N

BIOL 105  General Biology I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite:  Students must be eligible for (as determined by COMPASS score or other assessment) or currently enrolled in college level Math and English courses (100-level or greater).

For science and pre-professional majors and those with strong interest in science. This course includes the principles of cellular and molecular biology, including the chemistry of life, metabolism, photosynthesis, classical and molecular genetics, genetic regulation, and cellular reproduction. IAI: L1 900L; BIO 910

BIOL 261 Microbiology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 105 or 145 or instructor consent.
The study of microorganisms including historical background, morphology, physiology, growth, identification, genetics, control, immunology, and diseases. Laboratory is stressed.

CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 110; or the completion of MATH 112 “C” or better, Math 118 “C” or better, or Math 123 “C or better, or by Algebra assessment.
Fundamental principles of stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure and thermochemistry with applications to gases, liquids, solids and solutions. IAI: P1 902L; CHM 911

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101.
Continuation of CHEM 101. Equilibrium calculations, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, coordination compounds, inorganic chemistry. IAI: CHM 912

ECON 221 Principles of Macro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic macro economic principles of a capitalistic economy, its strengths and weaknesses including supply and demand, prices, role of government, national income measurement and determination, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation and unemployment, international trade and payments. IAI: S3 901

ECON 222 Principles of Micro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic micro economic principles of a capitalistic economy emphasizing supply and demand, prices, elasticity, competitive forms in product and resource markets, government and business relationships, poverty, and agriculture. IAI: S3 902

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

HIST 105 History of the United States to 1877
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Surveys the history of the United States from the discovery of America through 1865, including settlement and westward expansion, the development of the American government, the growth of the American economy, the evolution of an American style of life and thought, and the development of sectionalism culminating in the Civil War. IAI: S2 900

HIST 106 History of the United States Since 1877
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: HIST 105 not required for enrollment.
Examines history of the United States from close of the Civil War through the present, including the rise of the U.S. as a major world power, the continued growth and development of the federal government, efforts to improve the status of minorities and women, the growth of the economy, and the changing pattern of American life. IAI: S2 901

MATH 108 Statistics for General Education
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 086 or 090 or 091 “C” or better and Math 085.
Focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills and appreciation. Descriptive methods (frequency distributions, graphing and measures of location and variation), basic probability theory (sample spaces, counting, factorials, combinations, permutations, and probability laws), probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distributions, and random samples and sampling techniques), statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test, and chi-square test, and errors), correlation and regression, and f-test and analysis of variance. IAI: M1 902

MATH 124 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 118 or MATH 112 and MATH 116 “C” or better.
First semester calculus including analytic geometry, with emphasis on functions, limits, continuity, derivative and some of its applications, differentials, antiderivatives, and the definite integral. IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

MATH 131 Finite Mathematics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 112 “C” or better.
This course applies the concepts of algebra to problems found in economics, business, and non-physical sciences. The emphasis is on applications. Topics include linear systems and programming, matrix algebra, mathematics of finance, and an introduction to probability and Markov Chains. IAI: M1 906

MATH 132 Calculus for Bus/Soc Sciences
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or MATH 112 “C” or better.
A calculus course which includes differential and integral calculus as applied to business, economics, sociology and natural science. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, and integration. IAI: M1 900-B

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or ENG 091 or REA 098 “C” or better.
Some of the basic problems of philosophy. A consideration of the great philosophical systems dating from Socrates to the present. IAI: H4 900

PHYS 101 College Physics I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent or instructor consent.
For students majoring in a field other than pre-engineering, mathematics or physics. Theory of mechanics, heat and sound. Graduation credit not permitted for both PHYS 101 and 201. IAI: P1 900L

PHYS 102 College Physics II
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHYS 101.
Theory of magnetism, electricity, light and topics from atomic and nuclear physics. Graduation credit not permitted for both PHYS 102 and 202.

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.
A survey of the field of general psychology without specific emphasis on any particular theory or model of human or animal behavior. Fundamental principles, methods, theories and issues in the field are discussed. Content areas may include learning, thinking, neuroscience, methodology, memory, perception, personality, intelligence, emotion, adjustment, and abnormality among others. IAI: S6 900

SOC 101  Principles of Sociology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS required, or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.

Scientific examination of human society and social behavior. Concentrates on human behavior and assumes that it is largely shaped by the groups to which people belong and by the social interaction taking place in these groups. Acquire a basic sociological understanding and sensitivity to the issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. IAI: S7 900

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900