Events

 
SMTWTFS
View all »

Tutoring

Computer Specialist-Programming Track

Last updated 4/7/2014

Code: 5178

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Debbie Collins, 309-796-5316, collinsd@bhc.edu
Jamie Hill, 309-796-5284, hillj@bhc.edu
Don Mosier, 309-796-5278, mosierd@bhc.edu

East Campus
Jodee Werkheiser, 309-854-1821, werkheiserj@bhc.edu


This degree is offered only at the Quad-Cities Campus.

The Computer Specialist Associate in Applied Science degree is a multi-disciplinary degree designed to produce graduates with the knowledge necessary to work in today’s information technology environment. All students will study a variety of introductory courses consisting of HTML, networking, Windows and Linux operating systems, security, hardware, programming logic and Microsoft Project. With this strong foundation, students can go into depth by selecting a track for specialization. Tracks include Desktop Support Technician, Network Administration, Web Programming and Computer Programming. The degree is designed so that an individual may complete one of the related certificate programs (Desktop Support Technician Certificate, Web Developer Certificate, PC Application Programmer Certificate, Network Technician Certificate and Network Administrator Certificate), and then complete the Computer Specialist Associate’s degree. Individuals may also enroll directly in the Computer Specialist program without any prior coursework. The two-year course of study culminates in the internship which provides valuable on-the-job experience.

Many of the courses prepare students for industry-related certifications including CompTIA’s A+ and N+ certification, Microsoft’s MCITP (Microsoft Certified IT Professional) and MTS certification, CISCO’s CCNA and CCENT certification, and CIW (Certified Internet Web Professional) Foundations exam.

About the tracks: Desktop support work involves installing, configuring, repairing, and managing computer hardware and software. Network administration work manages the back-office by building and configuring networks, installing and configuring servers and workstations, troubleshooting hardware, network, and related problems including routers and switches. Network security work secures systems and detects security attacks. Programmers design and create complex programs in high-level languages. Languages studied include Visual Basic, SQL, VBA, and Java. Web programmers develop and update websites with interactive technologies including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Flash, ASP.NET and PHP.

Computer Specialist-Programming Track
Code: 5178
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
CIP 101 — Computer Logic & Design (4)
CIP 104 — Intro to Computer Programming (3)
CIP 170 — Web Page Development  or  (3)
CIP 170A  and  CIP 170B (4)
CIP 126 — Microsoft Access - fall only (3)
*ENGT 105 — PC Applications in Technology (3)

Second Semester
COER 112 — Microcomputer Operating Systems (3)
BE 180 — Business Communication  or  (3-4)
ENG 101 — Composition I
CIP 204 — Visual Basic Programming (4)
CIP 227 — Database Management II - spring only (3)
CIP 151 — Adv. Office Applications w/VBA - spring only (3)

Summer
General Ed Elective in Humanities, Social Sciences, Science, Non-Western Studies (3)

Third Semester
NETW 120 — Basic Computer Networks (3)
NETW 170 — Intro to Information Security (3)
CIP 205 — Advanced Visual Basic - fall only (4)
CIP 280 — Intro to Game Programming - fall only (3)
COER 116 — Microcomputer Hardware (3)

Minimester
CIP 201 — Microsoft Project (1)

Fourth Semester
CIP 250 — Java Programming Fundamentals - spring only (3)
CIP 260 — Systems Design and Development - spring only (3)
CIP 270 — Field Project - spring only (3)
SPEC 111 — Business and Professional Comm  or  (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication

Minimum total hours required for degree (65)

* May Substitue with CS 100 Introduction to Computers (3)

Courses for this program include: »

BE 180 Business Communications
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Students must have one of the following placement tests within given scores: ACT English, 22-36; or ASSET writing, 37-55; or COMPASS writing, 32-99.15

Techniques of effective written communications for business. This will include psychology of communicating with customer service emphasis, focus on international communications, and accuracy and conciseness needed for in-house e-mail.

CIP 101 Computer Logic and Design
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
An introduction to problem solving and logic needed for working with computer systems. Students will learn to analyze problems and apply the three basic programming structures – sequence, decision, and repetition – and top-down design to develop a solution. Students will also learn number systems, logic, truth tables, Boolean logic, base 2 and base 16 representations. Students will learn the tools used for problem solving such as structure charts, flowcharts, pseudo code, decision tables, and UML. Other topics covered include the concept of a computer system and programming methods.

CIP 104 Intro to Computer Programming
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CIP 101 or concurrent enrollment in CIP 101 recommended.

This course teaches the student the use of key structured programming statements and the use of a programming language in writing microcomputer application programs. Proper programming design, structure, and logic are emphasized.

CIP 126 Microsoft Access
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Analysis of procedures, personnel, and hardware necessary in electronic database processing. Topics covered include review of design, creation, and maintenance of databases including a study of tables and data validation, relationships, queries, forms, reports, macros, SQL, and normalization of tables.

CIP 151 Adv Office Applications w/VBA
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: CIP 101 or CIP 104 and CIP 130 or CIP 126 or CS 100 or ENGT 105 or instructor consent.
This is an advanced course in Microsoft Office applications that prepares students for Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) certification exam in Word, Excel, and Access. Student will learn to automate Microsoft Office applications using VBA (Visual Basic for Applications).

CIP 170 Web Page Development
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The student will learn Web site development with the three methods that have been used sine Web design first began: hand-coding HTML using a text editor; building Web pages using a WYSIWYG editor like Dreamweaver; and using the most modern method, a Content Management System that separates design from content while making it easy for non-technical users to update a site. Topics include: design principles, formatting Web pages with cascading style sheets, server-side vs. client-side technologies, testing Web pages with multiple Web browsers, and Web servers. In addition, the student will learn how to stay current on W3C standards for Web page development.
4 credit hours: 4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.

CIP 170A Web Page Development I – HTML/CSS
2 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The student will learn website development with how Web design first began: hand-coding HTML using a text editor. Students will also format web pages with cascading style sheets using a text editor. Topics include: design principles, formatting web pages with cascading style sheets, server-side vs. client-side technologies, testing web pages with multiple web browsers. In addition, the student will learn how to stay current on W3C standards for web page development.

CIP 170B Dreamweaver
2 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The student will learn website development using Dreamweaver (an HTML Editor) and will learn the concept of maintaining a site using Content Management System software. Topics include: Dreamweaver views, CSS, Layout, Assets, and Behaviors in Dreamweaver. Students will learn how to create and manage a web site within Dreamweaver.

CIP 201  Microsoft Project
1 cr. hr.;
1 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows OS.
Develop an understanding of and ability to use Microsoft project in managing projects. Case studies will be Information Technology focused projects.

CIP 204  Visual Basic Programming
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CIP 104 or instructor consent.

This course uses the latest version of the Visual Basic programming language to create GUI-based (Windows) applications applying effective development strategies based on object-oriented programming. Topics include: controls, methods, events, array processing, classes, text file processing, graphics and multimedia, working with multiple forms, creating a setup program, and defensive programming with error trapping.

CIP 205 Advanced Visual Basic
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CIP 204.
This course provides the student with more advanced programming techniques using the latest version of Visual Basic. Topics covered: data controls, user-created controls, ADO.NET, multi-tier applications, classes, and MDI. Windows applications, console applications, and web applications will be developed.

CIP 227  Database Management II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
This course provides the student with database concepts and implementation using Microsoft SQL Server. Topics covered include: data modeling, normalization, SQL, transaction management, recovery, SQL Server Administration, triggers, views, indexes and security. Students will design and build databases using SQL Server

CIP 250  Java Programming Fundamentals
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: CIP 104 or instructor consent.
This course is designed to teach the student the fundamentals of the Java programming Language and Java programming for the Web. Students will create Java programs, containing fundamental control structures, event handling, objects, I/O and applet development.

CIP 260  Systems Design and Development
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
This course is designed to guide the student through the five stages in the evolution of a system. Effective use of management sciences in meeting the needs of business systems through class projects and an off-campus project.

CIP 270  Field Project
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
For CIP students in the last semester of the CIP program. Students obtain employment in an approved CIP position to gain on-the-job experience.

CIP 280  Intro to Game Programming
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: CIP 204 or CS 121 or instructor consent.
Students will learn introductory game programming concepts using an object-oriented approach VB or C# programming language and DirectX. Topics include: understanding game loops, mouse and keyboard input, sprites, animation, object behaviors, sound scrolling, collision detection, transformations and events. The student will develop several real-time, interactive gaming projects.

COER 112 Microcomputer Operating Systems
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This is a course on Microcomputer Operating Systems. The two operating systems of focus are Windows and Linux. Each will be explored independently in a comparative fashion with a primary focus on the usage of the command-line interfaces.

COER 116 Microcomputer Hardware
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
This course is an introduction to microcomputer hardware components, from a technician’s perspective. Content includes motherboard, CPU, memory, storage devices, and I/O devices, etc. Emphasis is on installation and repair, as well as hardware/software interaction. Not an A+ Certification prep course, but provides a foundation for future pursuit of this credential.

CS 100 Introduction to Computers
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 1 lab hour per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or REA 093 “B” or better.

Introduction to computer concepts, computer applications, and the impact of computers on society. Applications include problem solving methods, word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics software. Basic Algebra or equivalent is recommended.

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: An ACT English score of 22-36, the appropriate COMPASS score, or successful completion of English 091.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENGT 105 PC Applications in Technology
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
A course designed for developing computer communicating information skills in an Engineering Technology career environment. Course focuses on needed computer operator skills; usage of current computer operating systems software and utilities; Microsoft’s Office application software Word, Excel, and Internet Explorer; Productivity software: Outlook; and Simulation software Automation Studio.

NETW 120 Basic Computer Networks
3 cr. hrs.;
2 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
An introductory course in networking for the technical student. Includes basic network hardware, software, troubleshooting, and maintenance.

NETW 170 Intro to Information Security
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: COER 112 and COER 116 and NETW 120 or NETW 125 with “C” or better, or successful completion of proficiency exam, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the topics, technologies and terminology associated with network information security. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in the security track of the Microcomputer Support Specialist degree.

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900

SPEC 111 Business and Professional Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Promotes awareness and development needed to communicate competently within professional organizations. Focus is on interviewing, management styles, inter-office communication and professional presentations.