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Supply Chain Management Transfer AA

Last updated 6/10/2014

Associate in Science Code 1054

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Paula Tigerman, 309-796-5323, tigermanp@bhc.edu
East Campus
Wendy Smith, 309-854-1713, smithw@bhc.edu


Students planning to major in Supply Chain Management at a four-year institution should follow the Black Hawk College Associate in Arts Business transfer program and substitute the Supply Chain Management course (BA 241) as a fourth semester elective instead of ACCT 205. Completion of the course of study outlined under Business Transfer will satisfy Black Hawk College graduation requirements. Consult with an advisor at Black Hawk College for details on specific requirements for the intended school of transfer.

This program is a base for a four-year degree in Supply Chain Management, or logistics, the field involved in moving goods from supplier to manufacturer to buyer in the most efficient manner possible. The field for bachelor’s degree graduates encompasses many job categories. Some of the positions are: logistics executives, warehouse managers and supervisors, business or finance analysts, production managers, import/export specialists, contract specialists, or buyers.

Supply Chain Management Transfer AA
Associate in Science Code 1054
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
CS 100 — Introduction to Computers (3)
1Life Sciences (3-4)
PSYC 101 — Introduction to Psychology  or  (3)
SOC 101 — Principles of Sociology
SPEC 101 — Principles of Public Speaking (3)

Second Semester
ACCT 101 — Financial Accounting (3)
ACCT 103 — Financial Accounting Lab (1)
Humanities (3)
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts (3)
2MATH 131 — Finite Mathematics (3)

Third Semester
ACCT 102 — Managerial Accounting (3)
ACCT 104 — Managerial Accounting Lab (1)
ECON 221 — Principles of Macro Economics (3)
2, 3MATH 108 — Statistics for General Education  or (3)
MATH 228 — Probability and Statistics
2, 4MATH 132 — Mathematics Analysis for Business  or  (4)
MATH 124 — Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
1Physical Science (3-4)

Fourth Semester
BL 201 — Business Law I (3)
ECON 222 — Principles of Micro Economics (3)
Fine Arts (3)
Non-Western Studies (3)
BA 241 — Introduction to Supply Chain Management (3)

Minimum total hours required for certificate (64)

1Physical and Life Sciences: Two courses (7 to 8 credits) with one course selected from the Life Sciences, one course from the Physical Sciences (include at least one laboratory course) or both NSCI 101 and NSCI 102.
2Consult an advisor.
3Students planning to transfer to WIU in the Supply Chain Management program may substitute MATH 108 for MATH 228.
4Students planning to transfer to WIU in the Supply Chain Management program may substitute MATH 124 for MATH 132.

Courses for this program include: »

ACCT 101 Financial Accounting
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Eligibility to enroll in MATH 112 or instructor consent. Concurrent enrollment in ACCT 103 or ACCT 103 “C” or better.
Introductory course for the study of financial accounting principles that presents accounting as an information system used to analyze, record, and communicate financial information about business performance. Emphasis is on understanding and applying basic accounting principles and concepts guiding the reporting of business transactions for service and merchandising enterprises. Topics covered include the accounting cycle (transaction analysis, accruals and deferrals, preparation of financial statements including the income statement, statement of stockholders’ equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows, and the closing process); internal controls, cash, recording and valuation of current and long-term receivables; merchandise inventory including perpetual and periodic systems and inventory valuation methods; long-term assets including property, plant, and equipment, natural resources, and intangible assets; cost allocation methods related to long-term assets including depreciation, depletion, and amortization; current liabilities (accounts payable, unearned revenues, and short-term notes payable); long-term liabilities (notes and bonds payable and related interest expense); contingent liabilities; and stockholders’ equity including retained earnings and paid-in capital. IAI: BUS 903

ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: ACCT 101 “C” or better or BA 170 and BA 180 “C” or better. Concurrent enrollment in ACCT 104 or ACCT 104 “C” or better.
An introductory course for the study of managerial accounting principles that presents managerial accounting as an information system used by managers for planning, controlling and directing business operations in domestic and international manufacturing and service environments. Emphasis is on understanding and applying common managerial accounting practices and decision-making techniques that support the achievement of an organization’s financial goals and objectives. Topics covered include the role of managerial accounting in domestic and international settings, classification and analysis of costs (product, period, variable, fixed, mixed, opportunity, sunk and differential), costing systems (job-order, process, activity-based, variable, absorption, standard, just-in-time) cost-volume-profit relationships, break-even analysis, preparation and analysis of budgets (master budget with supporting schedules, flexible budget), standard costs and variance analysis, preparation and analysis of financial statements (pro forma Income Statement, pro forma Balance Sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows), and analysis of financial statements (vertical, horizontal, and ratio). IAI: BUS 904

ACCT 103 Financial Accounting Lab
1 cr. hr.;
0 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ACCT 101 or ACCT 101 “C” or better.
An introductory course which provides a computerized learning environment to support the study of financial accounting principles that presents accounting as an information system used to analyze, record, and communicate financial information about business performance. Emphasis is on understanding and applying basic accounting principles and concepts guiding the reporting of business transactions for service and merchandising enterprises. Topics covered include the accounting cycle (transaction analysis, accruals, and deferrals, preparation of financial statements including the income statement, statement of stockholders’ equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flow, the closing process); internal controls; cash; recording and valuation of current and long-term receivables; merchandise inventory including perpetual and periodic systems and inventory valuation methods; long-term assets including property, plant, and equipment, natural resources, and intangible assets; cost allocation methods related to long-term assets including depreciation, depletion, and amortization; current liabilities (accounts payable, unearned revenues, and short-term notes payable); long-term liabilities (notes and bonds payable and related interest expense); contingent liabilities; and stockholders; equity including retained earnings and paid-in capital. IAI: BUS 903

ACCT 104 Managerial Accounting Lab
1 cr. hr.;
0 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ACCT 102 or ACCT 102 “C” or better.
An introductory course which provides a computerized learning environment to support the study of managerial accounting principles that presents managerial accounting as an information system used by managers for planning, controlling and directing business operations in domestic and international manufacturing and service environments. Emphasis is on understanding and applying common managerial accounting practices and decisions-making techniques that support the achievement of an organization’s financial goals and objectives. Topics covered include the role of managerial accounting in domestic and international settings, classification and analysis of costs (product, period, variable, fixed, mixed, opportunity, sunk and differential), costing systems (job-order, process, activity-based, variable, absorption, standard, just-in-time) cost-volume-profit relations, break-even analysis, preparation and analysis of budgets (master budget with supporting schedules, flexible budget), standard costs and variance analysis, preparation and analysis of financial statements (pro forma Income Statement, pro forma Balance sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows), and analysis of financial statements (vertical, horizontal, and ratio). IAI: BUS 904

BA 241 Introduction to Supply Chain Management
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
This course will give students an overview of the field of logistics, as well as information and skills specific to computerized inventory management. Topics include an overview of supply chain management and related terminology, warehouse and transportation operations, typical warehouse management software, and warehousing technologies – including radio frequency and basic accounting and economic principles.

BL 201 Business Law I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: BA 110 recommended.
A general survey of the basic principles, systems and practices of American law including government agencies and regulation, alternative dispute resolution, torts, employment law, bankruptcy, international law, and consumer protection.

CS 100 Introduction to Computers
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 1 lab hour per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or REA 093 “B” or better.
Introduction to computer concepts, computer applications, and the impact of computers on society. Applications include problem solving methods, word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics software. Basic Algebra or equivalent is recommended.

ECON 221 Principles of Macro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic macro economic principles of a capitalistic economy, its strengths and weaknesses including supply and demand, prices, role of government, national income measurement and determination, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation and unemployment, international trade and payments. IAI: S3 901

ECON 222 Principles of Micro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic micro economic principles of a capitalistic economy emphasizing supply and demand, prices, elasticity, competitive forms in product and resource markets, government and business relationships, poverty, and agriculture.
IAI: S3 902

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

MATH 108 Statistics for General Education
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 086 or 090 or 091 “C” or better and Math 085.
Focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills and appreciation. Descriptive methods (frequency distributions, graphing and measures of location and variation), basic probability theory (sample spaces, counting, factorials, combinations, permutations, and probability laws), probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distributions, and random samples and sampling techniques), statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test, and chi-square test, and errors), correlation and regression, and f-test and analysis of variance. IAI: M1 902

MATH 124 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 118 or MATH 112 and MATH 116 “C” or better.
First semester calculus including analytic geometry, with emphasis on functions, limits, continuity, derivative and some of its applications, differentials, antiderivatives, and the definite integral. IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

MATH 131 Finite Mathematics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 112 “C” or better.
This course applies the concepts of algebra to problems found in economics, business, and non-physical sciences. The emphasis is on applications. Topics include linear systems and programming, matrix algebra, mathematics of finance, and an introduction to probability and Markov Chains. IAI: M1 906

MATH 132 Calculus for Bus/Soc Sciences
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or MATH 112 “C” or better.
A calculus course which includes differential and integral calculus as applied to business, economics, sociology and natural science. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, and integration. IAI: M1 900-B

MATH 228 Probability and Statistics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 112 “C” or better.
This class discusses the descriptive and inferential methods of statistics. It includes measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, distributions of random variables, and the use of computer packages for analysis of data. IAI: M1 902, BUS 901

NSCI 101 Environmental Science I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduce scientific concepts underlying environmental processes and policies. This course will include topics such as methods of science, biological and physical science concepts and the history of environmentalism. Students wishing to use NSCI 101 as a general education science course must also complete NSCI 102. IAI: LP 900

NSCI 102 Environmental Science II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: NSCI 101.
Extension of NSCI 101. Covers ecology and biodiversity, food and soil resources, air pollution and climate change, water cycles and water pollution, and energy resources. IAI: LP 901L

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.
A survey of the field of general psychology without specific emphasis on any particular theory or model of human or animal behavior. Fundamental principles, methods, theories and issues in the field are discussed. Content areas may include learning, thinking, neuroscience, methodology, memory, perception, personality, intelligence, emotion, adjustment, and abnormality among others. IAI: S6 900

SOC 101  Principles of Sociology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS required, or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.

Scientific examination of human society and social behavior. Concentrates on human behavior and assumes that it is largely shaped by the groups to which people belong and by the social interaction taking place in these groups. Acquire a basic sociological understanding and sensitivity to the issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. IAI: S7 900

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900