Pre-Dietetics/Nutrition

Last updated 6/25/2015
nutrition

Associate in Arts Code 1080

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Xixuan Collins, 309-796-5269, collinsx@bhc.edu
East Campus
East Campus Advising, 309-854-1709


Students who successfully complete Dietetic/Nutrition training would find employment as a dietitian or nutritionist in hospitals, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, and offices of physicians or other health practitioners.

Licensure, certification, or registration requirements vary by state.

The pre-dietetics/nutrition curriculum at Black Hawk College will provide students with the course experiences needed to transfer to a four-year institution to complete requirements for a Bachelor’s degree with a major in dietetics, foods and nutrition, food service systems management, or a related field. The pre-dietetics/nutrition candidate will establish a good foundation of chemistry, biology and mathematics, as well as critical analytical thinking skills.

If the student desires an Associate in Science degree from Black Hawk College, he/she will need to select general education electives with Black Hawk College degree requirements in mind. Transfer institution requirements vary; students are strongly advised to contact their intended transfer institutions for specific admission/course requirements.

Pre-Dietetics/Nutrition
Associate in Arts Code 1080
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
2BIOL 120 — Nutrition (3)
1CHEM 101 — General Chemistry I (4)
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
Humanities  and  Fine Arts Elective (3)
1Mathematics Elective (3)

Second Semester
1CHEM 102 — General Chemistry II (4)
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
MATH 108 — Statistics for General Education (3)
PSYC 101 — Intro to Psychology (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication (3)

Third Semester
1BIOL 100 — Introduction to Biology  or  (4-5)
BIOL 105 — General Biology I  or
1SOC 101 — Principles of Sociology or  (3)
ECON 221 — Principles of Macro Economics
Humanities  and  Fine Arts Elective (3)
3Elective (3)
3Elective (3)

Fourth Semester
Humanities  and  Fine Arts Elective (3)
Non-Western Studies Elective (3)
Social & Behavioral Science Elective (3)
3Elective (3)
3Elective (3-4)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

1Major course requirements vary by transfer institution. Students are strongly advised to contact their intended transfer institution for specific admission/course requirements.
2BIOL 120 satisfies a major’s course requirement for the following institutions: FCS 2100 (EIU); FCS 102 (ISU); FN 101 (2 Cr., SIUC); and FCS 109 (WIU)
3Suggested electives (consult transfer institution): ACCT 101; ANTH 101; CS 100; ECON 221, 222; CHEM 203, 204; BIOL 145, 146, 150, 261; MATH 112, 124, 131, 132; PHIL 103; PSYC 290; SOC 102, SOC 251.

Courses for this program include: »

BIOL 100 Introduction to Biology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Intended for non-science majors. This course provides an introduction to important biological principles: (1) cellular biology including chemistry of life, cell structures, cell division, cell metabolism, classical and molecular genetics; (2) organismal biology including diversity, evolution, and ecology. IAI: L1 900L

BIOL 105 General Biology I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Students must be eligible for (as determined by COMPASS score or other assessment) or currently enrolled in college level Math and English courses (100-level or greater).
For science and pre-professional majors and those with strong interest in science. This course includes the principles of cellular and molecular biology, including the chemistry of life, metabolism, photosynthesis, classical and molecular genetics, genetic regulation, and cellular reproduction. IAI: L1 900L; BIO 910

BIOL 120 Nutrition
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Reviews the principles of nutritional science, the steps of scientific method applied to nutrition research, and the current nutritional concepts and controversies. Topics include digestion, absorption, and functions of macronutrients and micronutrients; diet analysis; malnutrition; under-nutrition; and nutritional needs of pregnancy, infancy and other sages of life.

CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 110; or the completion of MATH 112 “C” or better, Math 118 “C” or better, or Math 123 “C or better, or by Algebra assessment.
Fundamental principles of stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure and thermochemistry with applications to gases, liquids, solids and solutions. IAI: P1 902L; CHM 911

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101.
Continuation of CHEM 101. Equilibrium calculations, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, coordination compounds, inorganic chemistry. IAI: CHM 912

ECON 221 Principles of Macro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic macro economic principles of a capitalistic economy, its strengths and weaknesses including supply and demand, prices, role of government, national income measurement and determination, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation and unemployment, international trade and payments. IAI: S3 901

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

MATH 108 Statistics for General Education
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or MATH 086, 090, 091 or 094 “C” or better.
Focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills and appreciation. Descriptive methods (frequency distributions, graphing and measures of location and variation), basic probability theory (sample spaces, counting, factorials, combinations, permutations, and probability laws), probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distributions, and random samples and sampling techniques), statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test, and chi-square test, and errors), correlation and regression, and f-test and analysis of variance. IAI: M1 902

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.\
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.
A survey of the field of general psychology without specific emphasis on any particular theory or model of human or animal behavior. Fundamental principles, methods, theories and issues in the field are discussed. Content areas may include learning, thinking, neuroscience, methodology, memory, perception, personality, intelligence, emotion, adjustment, and abnormality among others. IAI: S6 900

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS required, or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.
Scientific examination of human society and social behavior. Concentrates on human behavior and assumes that it is largely shaped by the groups to which people belong and by the social interaction taking place in these groups. Acquire a basic sociological understanding and sensitivity to the issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. IAI: S7 900

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900