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Pre-Dietetics/Nutrition

Last updated 5/30/2014
nutrition

Associate in Arts Code 1080

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Xixuan Collins, 309-796-5269, collinsx@bhc.edu
East Campus
Vashti Berry, 309-854-1711, berryv@bhc.edu


Students who successfully complete Dietetic/Nutrition training would find employment as a dietitian or nutritionist in hospitals, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, and offices of physicians or other health practitioners.

Licensure, certification, or registration requirements vary by state.

The pre-dietetics/nutrition curriculum at Black Hawk College will provide students with the course experiences needed to transfer to a four-year institution to complete requirements for a Bachelor’s degree with a major in dietetics, foods and nutrition, food service systems management, or a related field. The pre-dietetics/nutrition candidate will establish a good foundation of chemistry, biology and mathematics, as well as critical analytical thinking skills.

If the student desires an Associate in Science degree from Black Hawk College, he/she will need to select general education electives with Black Hawk College degree requirements in mind. Transfer institution requirements vary; students are strongly advised to contact their intended transfer institutions or specific admission/course requirements.

Pre-Dietetics/Nutrition
Associate in Arts Code 1080
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
1CHEM 101 — General Chemistry I (4)
2BIOL 120 — Nutrition (3)
1Mathematics Elective (3)
Humanities  and  Fine Arts Elective (3)

Second Semester
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication (3)
PSYC 101 — Intro to Psychology (3)
1CHEM 102 — General Chemistry II (4)
MATH 108 — Statistics for General Education (3)

Third Semester
Humanities  and  Fine Arts Elective (3)
1SOC 101 — Principles of Sociology or  (3)
ECON 221 — Principles of Macro Economics
1BIOL 100 — Introduction to Biology  or  (4-5)
BIOL 105 — General Biology I  or
BIOL 108 — Principles of Biology I
3Electives (6)

Fourth Semester
Humanities  and  Fine Arts Elective (3)
Non-Western Studies Elective (3)
Social & Behavioral Science Elective (3)
3Electives (3-4)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

1Major course requirements vary by transfer institution. Students are strongly advised to contact their intended transfer institution for specific admission/course requirements.
2BIOL 120 satisfies a major’s course requirement for the following institutions: FCS 2100 (EIU); FCS 102 (ISU); FN 101 (2 Cr., SIUC); and FCS 109 (WIU)
3Suggested electives (consult transfer institution): ACCT 101; ANTH 101; CS 100; ECON 221, 222; CHEM 203, 204; BIOL 145, 146, 150, 261; MATH 112, 124, 131, 132; PHIL 103; PSYC 290; SOC SOC, 102, 251.

Courses for this program include: »

ACCT 101 Financial Accounting
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Eligibility to enroll in MATH 112 or instructor consent. Concurrent enrollment in ACCT 103 or ACCT 103 “C” or better.
Introductory course for the study of financial accounting principles that presents accounting as an information system used to analyze, record, and communicate financial information about business performance. Emphasis is on understanding and applying basic accounting principles and concepts guiding the reporting of business transactions for service and merchandising enterprises. Topics covered include the accounting cycle (transaction analysis, accruals and deferrals, preparation of financial statements including the income statement, statement of stockholders’ equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows, and the closing process); internal controls, cash, recording and valuation of current and long-term receivables; merchandise inventory including perpetual and periodic systems and inventory valuation methods; long-term assets including property, plant, and equipment, natural resources, and intangible assets; cost allocation methods related to long-term assets including depreciation, depletion, and amortization; current liabilities (accounts payable, unearned revenues, and short-term notes payable); long-term liabilities (notes and bonds payable and related interest expense); contingent liabilities; and stockholders’ equity including retained earnings and paid-in capital. IAI: BUS 903

ANTH 101 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Explores human origins, fossil records, human adaptation and variation, population genetics, and humankind’s place in world ecology. IAI: SI 902

BIOL 100 Introduction to Biology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Intended for non-science majors. This course provides an introduction to important biological principles: (1) cellular biology including chemistry of life, cell structures, cell division, cell metabolism, classical and molecular genetics; (2) organismal biology including diversity, evolution, and ecology. IAI: L1 900L

BIOL 105 General Biology I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Students must be eligible for (as determined by COMPASS score or other assessment) or currently enrolled in college level Math and English courses (100-level or greater).
For science and pre-professional majors and those with strong interest in science. This course includes the principles of cellular and molecular biology, including the chemistry of life, metabolism, photosynthesis, classical and molecular genetics, genetic regulation, and cellular reproduction. IAI: L1 900L; BIO 910

BIOL 108 Principles of Biology I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
The first of a two semester sequence in introductory biology which covers the chemistry of living organisms, cellular biology, respiration, photosynthesis, classical and molecular genetics and biotechnology. IAI: L1 900L

BIOL 120 Nutrition
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Reviews the principles of nutritional science, the steps of scientific method applied to nutrition research, and the current nutritional concepts and controversies. Topics include digestion, absorption, and functions of macronutrients and micronutrients; diet analysis; malnutrition; under-nutrition; and nutritional needs of pregnancy, infancy and other sages of life.

BIOL 145 Anatomy Physiology I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Students must complete both #1 & #2 below or have instructor approval.
1. Biology 100, 101, or 105 and Chemistry 101 or 110 with a “C” or better; or a score of 70% or higher on the Anatomy and Physiology placement exam.
2. REA 098 & MATH 080 (or COMPASS equivalent) and students must be eligible for (as determined by COMPASS score or other assessment) or currently enrolled in college-level English courses (100-level or greater).

A systematic study of the anatomical-physiological aspects of the human body. Topics include homeostasis, biomolecules, cytology, histology, as well as integumentary, skeleto-muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.

BIOL 146 Anatomy Physiology II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 145 “C” or better.
Continuation of BIOL 145. Systematic study of cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Fluids, electrolytes, acid-base balance, metabolism, and human development are also studied.

BIOL 150 Medical Terminology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: 83 or above on COMPASS reading test or REA 098 “C” or better.
This course presents the principles of medical word construction through identification of root words, prefixes, suffices, combining forms, and methods of building medical terms. Emphasis is placed on correct medical word spelling, pronunciation, and definition, while introducing terminology specific to various body systems. The course is intended to prepare students to classify medical information for use in medical coding, billing, and reporting.

BIOL 261 Microbiology
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: BIOL 105 or 145 or instructor consent.
The study of microorganisms including historical background, morphology, physiology, growth, identification, genetics, control, immunology, and diseases. Laboratory is stressed.

CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or CHEM 110; or the completion of MATH 112 “C” or better, Math 118 “C” or better, or Math 123 “C or better, or by Algebra assessment.
Fundamental principles of stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure and thermochemistry with applications to gases, liquids, solids and solutions. IAI: P1 902L; CHM 911

CHEM 102 General Chemistry II
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101.
Continuation of CHEM 101. Equilibrium calculations, electrochemistry, acid-base theory, coordination compounds, inorganic chemistry. IAI: CHM 912

CHEM 203 Organic Chemistry I
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 3 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101.
Synthetic and mechanistic features of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides and alcohols, including nomenclature. IAI: CHM 913

CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry II
5 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 6 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 203.
Continuation of CHEM 203. Emphasis on functional group reactions and mechanisms with spectrochemical interpretations. IAI: CHM 914

CS 100 Introduction to Computers
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 1 lab hour per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or REA 093 “B” or better.
Introduction to computer concepts, computer applications, and the impact of computers on society. Applications include problem solving methods, word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation and web-based applications. Basic Algebra or equivalent is recommended.

ECON 221 Principles of Macro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic macro economic principles of a capitalistic economy, its strengths and weaknesses including supply and demand, prices, role of government, national income measurement and determination, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation and unemployment, international trade and payments. IAI: S3 901

ECON 222 Principles of Micro Economics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Study of the basic micro economic principles of a capitalistic economy emphasizing supply and demand, prices, elasticity, competitive forms in product and resource markets, government and business relationships, poverty, and agriculture. IAI: S3 902

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

MATH 108 Statistics for General Education
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 086 or 090 or 091 “C” or better and Math 085.
Focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems, rather than on routine skills and appreciation. Descriptive methods (frequency distributions, graphing and measures of location and variation), basic probability theory (sample spaces, counting, factorials, combinations, permutations, and probability laws), probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distributions, and random samples and sampling techniques), statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test, and chi-square test, and errors), correlation and regression, and f-test and analysis of variance. IAI: M1 902

MATH 112 College Algebra
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 086 or 090 or 091 “C” or better and MATH 085.
Includes theory, graphs, and applications of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions (including symmetry and translations); inequalities, radicals, complex numbers, conics, systems of equations and matrices.

MATH 124 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 118 or MATH 112 and MATH 116 “C” or better.
First semester calculus including analytic geometry, with emphasis on functions, limits, continuity, derivative and some of its applications, differentials, antiderivatives, and the definite integral. IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

MATH 131 Finite Mathematics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate initial placement score (within the last 6 months) or MATH 112 “C” or better.
This course applies the concepts of algebra to problems found in economics, business, and non-physical sciences. The emphasis is on applications. Topics include linear systems and programming, matrix algebra, mathematics of finance, and an introduction to probability and Markov Chains. IAI: M1 906

MATH 132 Calculus for Bus/Soc Sciences
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or MATH 112 “C” or better.
A calculus course which includes differential and integral calculus as applied to business, economics, sociology and natural science. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, and integration. IAI: M1 900-B

PHIL 103 Ethics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or ENG 091 or REA 098 “C” or better.
Presents an introduction to the moral problems of society with an emphasis on concepts and systems. IAI: H4 904

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.
A survey of the field of general psychology without specific emphasis on any particular theory or model of human or animal behavior. Fundamental principles, methods, theories and issues in the field are discussed. Content areas may include learning, thinking, neuroscience, methodology, memory, perception, personality, intelligence, emotion, adjustment, and abnormality among others. IAI: S6 900

PSYC 290 Educational Psychology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 “C” or better.
The application of research-based psychological principles to education and teaching-learning processes. Special emphasis on understanding growth and development, the learning process, motivation, intelligence, evaluation, measurement, creativity and the impact of culture on learning styles.

SOC 101  Principles of Sociology
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: College level reading scores on COMPASS required, or REA 098 and SBS 100 “C” or better.

Scientific examination of human society and social behavior. Concentrates on human behavior and assumes that it is largely shaped by the groups to which people belong and by the social interaction taking place in these groups. Acquire a basic sociological understanding and sensitivity to the issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. IAI: S7 900

SOC 251 Marriage and the Family
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC 101.
Survey of the contemporary family in historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Includes trends in mate selection, marriage, child-rearing, employment, gender roles, and communication within the family. IAI: S7 902

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900