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Philosophy Transfer AA

Last updated 5/30/2014

Associate in Arts Code 1036

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
William Desmond, 309-796-5437, desmondw@bhc.edu
East Campus
Vashti Berry, 309-854-1711, berryv@bhc.edu


Students taking the recommended courses in philosophy will study the writings of philosophers who have made crucial contributions to the way we think about subjects such as ethics, religion, psychology, aesthetics, political theory, the nature of science, and what it means in general to think clearly. Students will participate in class discussions as well as express in writing their views on a variety of philosophical issues.

Since advancement in most occupations depends on one’s ability to speak and write clearly and logically and to understand the beliefs of others, philosophy is an important part of any educational program. Selected philosophy courses fit well into various academic majors such as business, health careers, history, government, psychology, sociology, literature, pre-law, and the natural sciences. An awareness of the philosophical background of our culture deeply enriches our view of the world, helping us understand the world and our place within it.

Students majoring in philosophy may enter advanced degree programs in preparation for teaching, law, political science and business.

Philosophy Transfer AA
Associate in Arts Code 1036
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)
First Semester
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
Life Science (4)
PHIL 100 — Logic (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communications (3)

Second Semester
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
Fine Arts (2)
HIST 222 — Comparative Religions  or  (3)
HIST 151 — History of the Middle East Since 1700  or
IS 220 — Global Issues
PHIL 101 — Introduction to Philosophy (3)
Physical Science (4)

Third Semester
Foreign Language (4)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts (3)
Mathematics (3)
PHIL 206 — Philosophy of Religion (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Fourth Semester
Foreign Language (4)
Mathematics  or  Computer Science (3)
PHIL 103 — Ethics (3)
PHIL 205 — Topics in Philosophy (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

Courses for this program include: »

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

HIST 151 History of the Middle East Since 1700
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Surveys Middle Eastern civilization with an emphasis on the period between 1700 and the present. Includes an examination of political, economic, social and religious development and the current condition of the Middle East. IAI: S2 919N

HIST 222 Comparative Religions
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
This course compares and contrasts the great religions of the world from the scholarly point of view as they emerged in Asia and developed throughout the world; the course focuses on their beliefs, practices, and work of inspiration.
IAI: H5 904N

IS 220 Global Issues
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
This course introduces students to contemporary global issues and international relations. These diverse, complex issues stem from the synergistic interaction of economic, socio-cultural, and political factors. This course examines various influences that impact global issues, such as nation-states, governmental and non-governmental organizations as well as issues relating to gender, ethnicity, and power. The course also explores causes of conflicts and reviews potential solutions to contemporary global crises. IAI: S5 904

PHIL 100 Logic
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Introduces the student to formal and informal logic. Examines logical fallacies that are found in everyday arguments as well as the basics of symbolic logic. IAI: H4 906

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or ENG 091 or REA 098 “C” or better.
Some of the basic problems of philosophy. A consideration of the great philosophical systems dating from Socrates to the present. IAI: H4 900

PHIL 103 Ethics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or ENG 091 or REA 098 “C” or better.
Presents an introduction to the moral problems of society with an emphasis on concepts and systems. IAI: H4 904

PHIL 205 Studies in Philosophy
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or REA 098 “C” or better; ENG 091 “C” or better; one course in philosophy or instructor consent.
Intensive study of one or more philosophical topics, philosophical traditions, or major philosophers. Philosophy of science and language, social and political philosophy, philosophy of law, rationalism, empiricism, analytic philosophy, Aristotle, Hume, Quine, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and aesthetics are among the offerings.

PHIL 206 Philosophy of Religion
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or REA 098 “C” or better; or ENG 091 “C” or better.
Discusses the intellectual problems of the religious experience. IAI: H4 905.

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900