English Literature Transfer AA

Last updated 6/29/2015

Associate in Arts Code 1005

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Torria Norman, 309-796-5432, normant@bhc.edu
East Campus
East Campus Advising, 309-854-1709


Students planning to major in English at a four-year institution should follow the Black Hawk College Associate in Arts curriculum. The completion of the course of study outlined below will satisfy graduation requirements of Black Hawk College.

Students taking this course of study will gain an intellectual and aesthetic awareness of literature. By reading works of poetry, fiction, drama and literary criticism, students will sharpen their critical thinking skills and deepen their cultural and aesthetic awareness of the humanities. Such studies are excellent preparation for employment in teaching, publishing, and all areas of communication.

Students enrolled at Black Hawk’s Literature Program should complete 64 credit hours of study by completing the 40-43 credits of Core Requirements and an additional 21 credits of English Literature and Writing courses.

Why Study Literature at Black Hawk?

The Literature Program at Black Hawk College provides excellent preparation for students planning to transfer to a four-year university.  Students in the Literature Program can study the traditional core subjects of an English major, including the three introduction courses, two American literature courses, two British literature courses, Shakespeare, and the two Western literature courses which cover the most important literature in the United Stated and Europe during the last 2,500 years.

The Literature Program also offers a variety of world literature and special topics courses that are not offered at many community colleges.  Offerings in non-Western literature include Eastern literature, African and Caribbean literature, and Latin American literature.  Courses with special topics include Minority American literature, Film as Literature, Women’s literature, and Children’s literature.  Additionally, ENG 205 offers study of a special interest topic or genre.  Altogether, the unique course offering of BHC’s Literature Program covers the wide range of genres, areas, and special topics in the study of literature.

More broadly, the study of literature allows students the opportunity to develop marketable skills that they can use in a variety of professional fields and careers.  Literature courses help students develop their skills in reading, summarizing, analyzing, and evaluating written work.  Literature courses also ask students to formulate their own opinions in response to a written text, so successful Literature students can also effectively think about complex ideas, explain them to others, and defend them with reasons and supporting evidence when necessary.  In today’s technology-driven world, the ability to understand complex information, explain it to others, and act on it is a valuable skill in any industry.

The study of literature also brings personal enrichment and a broader understanding of the world.  Literature has been traditionally called “the great conversation,” so anyone who is contemplating about committing to work in the humanities should be aware of this conversation.  Additionally, students who enroll in courses from BHC’s Literature Program are exposed to a variety of ideas and beliefs from Western and non-Western societies.  A better understanding of these cultures, through the study of the best and most important literature, can lead to a broader understanding of people’s values over time.

English Literature Transfer AA
Associate in Arts Code 1005
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
HIST 105 — History of the United States to 1877 (3)
Foreign Language (3)
Mathematics (4)
Social & Behavioral Science (3)

Second Semester
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
ENG 190 — Introduction to Literature (3)
HIST 106 — History of the United States Since 1877 (3)
Foreign Language (4)
Physical Science (3-4)

Third Semester
ENG 208 — Introduction to Poetry  or  (3)
ENG 210 — Introduction to Fiction
ENG 213 — American Literature I  or  (3)
ENG 221 — British Literature I
Foreign Language (4)
Mathematics  or  Computer Science (3-4)
Non-Western Studies (3)

Fourth Semester
ENG 214 — American Literature II  or  any other 200 level literature course (3)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communication (3)
THEA 111 — Introduction to Theatre (3)
Foreign Language (4)
Life Science (3-4)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

Courses for this program include: »

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

ENG 190 Introduction to Literature
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS score or concurrent enrollment in REA 098.
This course offers an introduction to works of poetry, drama, and fiction in order to develop the reader’s interpretive skills. The course is designed to promote an awareness of excellence in literature as well as an appreciation of diversity. IAI: H3 900

ENG 208 Introduction to Poetry
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 “C” or better.
ENG 208 is an introductory course designed to expose students to poetry as a genre with an emphasis on reading, discussing and writing effectively about a range of poems. IAI: H3 903

ENG 210 Introduction to Fiction
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 “C” or better.
Reading and discussion of representative short stories and novels from a range of literatures, with some attention to critical work on fiction. IAI: H3 901

ENG 213 American Literature I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 “C” or better.
A survey of representative works illustrating the development of American literature from its beginning to the Civil War with emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social and political contexts. IAI: H3 914

ENG 214 American Literature II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 “C” or better.
A survey of representative works illustrating the development of American Literature from the Civil War to the present, with a emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political context. IAI: H3 915

ENG 221 British Literature I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 “C” or better.
A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British Literature from its beginnings to 1800, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social and political contexts. IAI: H3 912

HIST 105 History of the United States to 1877
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Surveys the history of the United States from the discovery of America through 1865, including settlement and westward expansion, the development of the American government, the growth of the American economy, the evolution of an American style of life and thought, and the development of sectionalism culminating in the Civil War. IAI: S2 900

HIST 106 History of the United States Since 1877
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: HIST 105 not required for enrollment.
Examines history of the United States from close of the Civil War through the present, including the rise of the U.S. as a major world power, the continued growth and development of the federal government, efforts to improve the status of minorities and women, the growth of the economy, and the changing pattern of American life. IAI: S2 901

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900

THEA 111 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
An introductory survey of theatre/drama as a performing art form that includes the student and analysis of historical, social, aesthetic and technical aspects of traditional and contemporary theatrical/dramatic expression. This course is designed to introduce students to theatre as a major fine art form and to examine the contributions of playwrights, actors, directors, designers, and technicians. IAI: F1 907