Computer Science Transfer AS

Last updated 4/7/2014

Associate in Science Code 1532

Program Contacts:
QC Campus
Jamie Hill, 309-796-5284, hillj@bhc.edu
East Campus
Wendy Smith, 309-854-1713, smithw@bhc.edu


Students planning to major in computer science with a science emphasis at a four-year institution should follow the Black Hawk College Associate in Science curriculum. The completion of the course of study outlined will satisfy graduation requirements of Black Hawk College. Since universities may require specific courses for a computer science major, students should consult with the Transfer Center at Black Hawk College and/or a computer science advisor for additional information. Those not planning to transfer to a four-year school should also see the Computer Technology Programs.

The curriculum includes work with programming, problem analysis and simulation in JAVA, with applications from science, engineering, mathematics, business, and industry.

Students pursuing the Computer Science-Science curriculum are expected to complete the general requirements for the Associate in Science degree, including MATH 124, MATH 225, CS 121, CS 225, as well as technical electives based on requirements of the transfer institution.

Many of the courses needed to complete this curriculum are not available at the East Campus. Students should always consult with an academic advisor for course availability.

Computer Science Transfer AS
Associate in Science Code 1532
Course of Study Outline – Suggested Courses (Credit Hours)

First Semester
CS 121 — Introduction to Computer Science (5)
ENG 101 — Composition I (3)
MATH 124 — Calculus I with Analytic Geometry (4)
SPEC 101 — Principles of Speech Communications (3)

Second Semester
CS 225 — Advanced Programming (4)
ENG 102 — Composition II (3)
MATH 225 — Calculus II with Analytic Geometry (4)
*Technical Elective (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Third Semester
*Technical Elective (3)
Humanities (3)
Non-Western Studies (3)
Physical Science (4)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Fourth Semester
*Technical Elective (3)
Humanities  or  Fine Arts (3)
Life Science (4)
Fine Arts (3)
Social and Behavioral Science (3)

Minimum total hours required for degree (64)

*Technical Electives: Consult advisor for requirements of specific transfer institutions.
MATH 161 — Discrete Mathematics (3)
MATH 226 — Calculus III with Analytic Geometry (4)
CS 251 — Programming for Science (3)
CIP 204 — Visual Basic Programming (4)
CIP 126 — Microsoft Access (3)

Courses for this program include: »

CIP 126 Microsoft Access
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CS 100 or instructor consent.
Analysis of procedures, personnel, and hardware necessary in electronic database processing. Topics covered include review of design, creation, and maintenance of databases including a study of tables and data validation, relationships, queries, forms, reports, macros, SQL, and normalization of tables.

CIP 204 Visual Basic Programming
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CIP 104 or instructor consent.
This course uses the latest version of the Visual Basic programming language to create GUI-based (Windows) applications applying effective development strategies based on object-oriented programming. Topics include: controls, methods, events, array processing, classes, text file processing, graphics and multimedia, working with multiple forms, creating a setup program, and defensive programming with error trapping.

CS 121 Introduction to Computer Science
5 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or MATH 086, 090, 091 “C” or better. Recommended co-requisite: MATH 112, MATH 118, MATH 124 or MATH 131.
The first sequence of courses for computer science majors. Provides a disciplined approach to problem solving and algorithm development using a high level language for implementation. Includes sequence, selection and repetition control structures; program design, coding, debugging, testing, and documentation with emphasis on structured programming; arrays, records, and files. IAI: CS 911

CS 225 Advanced Programming
4 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 2 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: CS 121 “C” or better.
The second in a sequence of courses for computer science majors. Includes: software engineering; abstract data types; data structures- files, sets, pointers, lists, stacks, queues, trees; program verification and complexity; recursion; dynamic concepts – memory, scope, block structures; text processing; searching and sorting algorithms. Implementation is in a high level language. IAI: CS 912

CS 242 Computer Architecture
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hour per week.
Prerequisite: CS 225 “C” or better.
A study of the architecture of computer systems. Topics include combinational and sequential logic networks; computer arithmetic; memory hierarchy; CPU design; I/O architecture, hardware, and software; instruction sets and addressing modes; linking and loading.

CS 251 Programming for Science
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 124 “C” or better.
Structured programming with applications in mathematics, engineering, and the physical and biological sciences. Introduction to numerical methods and numerical analysis using a high level language as the language of implementation.

CS 252 Data Structures
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: CS 225 and MATH 161 “C” or better.
The third in a sequence of three courses for computer science majors. Includes: various algorithmic paradigms, recurrence relations; complexity analysis; advanced algorithms for sorting, searching and string processing; advanced abstract data types – sets, graphs, heaps, hash tables; random number generation, object-oriented programming.

ENG 101 Composition I
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACT English score of 22 or above; or appropriate COMPASS score; or English 091 “C” or better.
English 101 is designed for students who are competent in the fundamentals of composition. Students will write essays using a variety of expository strategies and will apply standard techniques of documentation when appropriate. IAI: C1 900

ENG 102 Composition II
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 101 “C” or better.
English 102 is a continuation of English 101, is a required composition course that involves reading, discussion, and analysis of a body of literature to generate ideas for critical and persuasive papers, including one documented research paper. IAI: C1 901R (Grade of “C” or higher required for this course to be eligible to be included in the IAI General Education Core Curriculum.)

MATH 124 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or MATH 118 or MATH 112 and MATH 116 “C” or better.
First semester calculus including analytic geometry, with emphasis on functions, limits, continuity, derivative and some of its applications, differentials, antiderivatives, and the definite integral. IAI: M1 900-1, MTH 901

MATH 161 Discrete Mathematics
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or MATH 112 “C” or better.
Includes the study of sets, functions, relations, logic and proof, mathematical induction, counting techniques, graph theory, trees, networks and recurrence relations. IAI: M1 905; CS 915

MATH 225 Calculus II with Analytic Geometry
4 cr. hrs.;
4 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 124 “C” or better.
Second semester calculus. Includes applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, sequences and series, polar coordinates and parametric equation. IAI: M1 900-2, MTH 902

MATH 226 Calculus III with Analytic Geometry
5 cr. hrs.;
5 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 225 “C” or better.
Includes vectors and vector-valued functions, surfaces in 3-space differential and integral calculus of multivariate functions, vector fields, line and surface integrals. IAI: M1 900-3, MTH 903

SPEC 101 Principles of Speech Communication
3 cr. hrs.;
3 lecture hours; 0 lab hours per week.
The oral communication course combines communication theory with the practice of oral communication skills. The oral communication course: (1) develops awareness of the communication process; (2) provides inventional, organizational, and expressive strategies; (3) promotes understanding of and adaptation to a variety of communication contexts; and (4) emphasizes critical skills in listening, reading, thinking and speaking. IAI: C2 900